Moral Differences Between Antigone And Carol Gilligan's

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Is it right to steal from the rich to give to the poor? An individual’s everyday decisions reveals their sense of right and wrong, or morality. In the play “Antigone” by Sophocles, Antigone disobeys Creon’s law in an attempt to bury her brother, Polyneices, which is forbidden. Due to their different values and social attitudes, many characters, including Antigone, Haimon, Ismene, and Eurydice end up dead, leaving Creon as the miserable ruler of Thebes. These differences in values can be described by moral development, which can be categorized into the different stages of Lawrence Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development and Carol Gilligan’s Ethics of Care Theory. Some reach all stages, some do not, and some go down in stages. The ends justify …show more content…
For example, Antigone reveals that she is at Stage 2, Conventional, as she conveys to Ismene, “I am not afraid of danger; If it means death, / It will not be the worst of deaths- death without honor” (Prologue.80-81). Antigone is risking her own life to bury her brother. She displays that she is incapable of taking care of herself, which is necessary in order for her to look out for others as well. Nonetheless, Creon is at Stage 1, Preconventional, which is seen as he questions Haemon, “Do you want me to show myself weak before the people?” (3.26). Creon knows that if someone, let alone a woman, breaks his law, then others may attempt to do the same after viewing his vulnerability. Creon, unlike Antigone, has a need to preserve his pride, which averts him from ruling properly. Both Gilligan and Kohlberg’s research can still be applied to present …show more content…
Breaking the law is not wrong as long as it is for the greater good. Although Kohlberg and Gilligan’s research are somewhat the same, they both contain a few flaws. Kohlberg’s research fails to include the population of men and women. Gilligan’s research includes both men and women, but she does not consider that all men and women have different thought processes. Similarity, in a theological study, they are critiqued, “Gilligan criticized Kohlberg for arguing that full moral development was found in the person who could reason well about justice as impartial and universal” (Keenan). Antigone is a more accurate representation of the morality of women because I would do the same thing if I were in her situation, in addition, Gilligan presents that women's morality is based on relationships, whereas men focus on justice and law, which is evident in her moral dilemma with 29 women in abortion consultation (Maddix). Nevertheless, by using the scales it is evident that Antigone has a more advanced sense of morality than Creon. Creon’s sense of morality suddenly changes as he realizes he is the reason why Antigone, Ismene, Haimon, and Eurydice are dead. Along with the tragic events, Antigone’s higher sense of morality contradicts Creon’s views, leading to his ultimate growth of righteousness, making Creon a true tragic hero. People make decisions daily based on their own moral values. Antigone and Creon’s

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