Moksha In Hinduism

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Moksha, as a concept in the religion of Hinduism, is the ultimate goal in life. Moksha is also known as liberation or salvation. Moksha is the ultimatet goal because Samsara or rebirth happens before the liberation. In order to attain Moksha, there is the cycle of rebirth as also known as Samsara. The maintenance of world order can be achieved through Dharma while Moksha is the release from the world. Karma, as the cause-and-effect to the Samsara, is doing good or well in your duty or social role. Working better in the present life will affect the future life. In Karma, it is a cause-and-effect concept. Life is a suffering then you can just be free from this suffering through Dharma, Karma, Samsara and Moksha. The cause of suffering is ignorance of the reality. In order to be …show more content…
Enlightenment is necessary for Moksha. In Hinduism, there is the way of works, way of knowledge and way of devotion as the road to salvation. The practice of Yoga (Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Jnana Yoga) is denying the self in work and love and absolute knowledge. Removing selfishness is the way to Moksha. Ignorance must also be removed in order to attain Moksha by the way of knowledge.

Also, doing one’s Dharma is necessary for Moksha. One has to be dedicated to fulfill one’s duty or social role in the world. In order to attain liberation, one has to discipline the self and be committed in doing one’s own role.

As the Bhagavad Gita 3:37 says, “The Blessed Lord said: It is lust only, Arjuna, which is born of contact with the material modes of passion and later transformed into wrath, and which is the all-devouring, sinful enemy of this world.” The selfish desire, anger and ignorance are the threefold cause of sin (Achari, 1993). Everyone will receive the fruits of actions through Karma. In order to cancel the bad effects of the action, one must do good works like good deeds, social service, pilgrimage and acts of piety and

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