Mental Illness And Crime Research Paper

Improved Essays
Running head: Mental Illness and Crime

Mental Illness And Correspondence To Crime
Daniel Costeira
Criminolgy CRM 360 Dr. Jaeckle Flagler College Abstract
Individuals with mental illness affect the United States criminal justice system, as at least one quarter of the general population, including those in prisons, jails, or on probations is mentally diseased. Most inmates have reported symptoms or a history of a mental health disorder. There are concerns regarding the growing population of the mentally afflicted and the significant need for treatment within in system. The well being of mentally ill individuals who are involved within institutions is being questioned along with the quality of safety that is provided within facilities.
…show more content…
The Consensus Project produced a study that depicts “police departments of U.S. cities with a population greater than 100,000, approximately 7 percent of all police contacts, both investigation and complaints, involved a person believed to have a mental illness” (Council of State Governments, 2002). Law enforcement officials constantly have to put themselves in harms way when handling incidents with mentally ill offenders. In year 1998, “mentally ill offenders killed law enforcement officers at a rate five and a half times greater than that of the rest of the population” (Council of State Governments, 2002). Emotionally disturbed persons compromise the safety of many, while many are compromising theirs as …show more content…
It is an example of law enforcement–based specialized response model. Until the CIT was developed, most basic law enforcement training referred to mentally ill individuals as emotionally disturbed people (EDP for short) and gave very basic instruction on the dangers officer’s would face encountering such individuals. This further training has actually led to a decrease in injuries to either party, and dropping rates of incarceration compared to the past. “Across the country, probation and parole officials are working with jail and prison admin¬istrators, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and community based treatment providers to develop strategies that maintain public safety while improving outcomes for people with mental illnesses under community corrections supervision. But all too often, these responses are not backed by research or data, and as a result, may be less sustainable, and successful than those that incorporates interventions”. (Prin, S. J., & Draper, L

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    In order to find solutions to this critical problem, it is important to understand the underlining issues surrounding the mental health system breakdown. Another essential element to solving this problem is to change the negative stigma society has towards mental illness by understanding it and its connection to crime and recidivism. This review aims to do just that in addition to discussing alternate approaches that may initiate positive changes in our mental health system and all that are affected by it. To begin, it might be helpful to gain a little insight about the effects…

    • 1559 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Taking an introspective look into the criminal mind, justice system, and the treatment of those entangled in its web is a daunting task, but in the three articles “A Death in the Box” by Mary Pfeiffer, “Supremacy Crimes” by Gloria Steinem, and “Masked Racism: Reflections on the Prison Industrial Complex” by Angela Davis, the reality is exposed and reveals a flawed system designed and utilized by the wealthy upper class to punish and theoretically enslave the mentally ill and minority groups. In particular, “Supremacy Crimes” details the generalization and vagueness with which the media chooses to present events of mass killings and other tragic situations and paints a picture towards the true culprit committing these crimes effectively opening…

    • 1267 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mental Illness In Prison

    • 1015 Words
    • 5 Pages

    By definition, mental illness is “an affliction with a mental disease or mental condition which is manifested by a disorder or disturbance in behavior, feeling, thinking, or judgment to such an extent that the person afflicted requires care, treatment and rehabilitation” (Hall, Miraglia, Lee, 2011). This definition of mental illness provides a broad overview of what many individuals in our society are dealing with every day. Although it may be seen as a problem in mainstream society, it is often overlooked in prison. Upwards of 61 percent of prisoners who committed a violent offense suffer from mental illness (CITE).…

    • 1015 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Overcrowding In Prison

    • 391 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Haney 2006, found that overcrowding results in correctional administrators implementing policies and procedures that may enable instead of relieving problems that may occur within a prison environment. Unfortunately this trend is evident between mentally ill offenders, because they often face the difficult task of adjusting and conforming to correctional policies. Furthermore, when a prison is also facing overcrowding it can intensify these problems. Thus, considering that mentally disabled inmates tend to become irate and violent in overcrowded prisons, it has become routine to place these individuals in solitary confinement to separate them from others within the facility (Ball, 2014). But while the Supreme Court condemns long term solitary…

    • 391 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Exactly half of the prisoners in the U.S. have mental health issues, states a 2006 Justice Department Study. Through my research I have found that jails and prisons are without a doubt considered to be new mental health facilities for those with mental illnesses. There is a high percentage of people who suffer from mental illnesses in prisons and jails, which has caused a ripple effect in taxation. The problem that arises from incarcerating people with mental illness for petty crimes, is that the money could be used more effectively. Due to how mental health illnesses have been treated in the past, appropriate and effective use of screenings and facilities shows to have more success with helping those with mental illnesses.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Correctional officers are held legally responsible to analyze their prisoner’s mental health needs; which includes the delivery of medications, treatment, and other forms of therapy (Osher et al.). By refusing to comply with the law and neglecting to arrange mental health services to the mentally challenged during custody, the United States government has failed to protect and defend many of its citizens. Criminals with mental disorders may be as guilty as the convicted felon who committed first- degree murder, but they should be treated differently in the criminal justice system. For, they have the mental capacity of an ignorant child and their disorder should be accounted for when imprisoned. “Many individuals with behavioral health disorder under correctional control have diverse and complicated needs, but with appropriate supervision and services, they are capable of recovery and ending their criminal justice involvement” (Osher at al.).…

    • 2016 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rather than taking the time to understand the mind of individuals who participate in criminal activity and helping to break reoccurring cycles, the criminal justice system is quick to criminalize these individuals, thus failing to realize that, in reality, these acts are just cries for help. Typically, when a person commits a crime, it is because some crime has been committed to them. There is something from their past that haunts their present and, ultimately, their future. However, no one takes the time to consider this. Crimes such as domestic violence, drug abuse, and theft are not looked into as actual mental illnesses that could illicit this type of behavior but just as a wrongdoing that must be…

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Working in the Human Service field and focusing on the criminal justice and forensic side opens up the opportunity to advocate for individuals who have been involved in our judicial system. “These practitioners are often tasked with coordinating and providing a diverse array of assistance, referral, advocacy, intervention, and other forms of support and services for diverse populations of individuals involved in the criminal justice system who are often impacted by mental illness.” (Brown, J. & Cich, J. (2017,…

    • 1039 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    A loved one, killed. This is many people’s worst nightmare. The loved ones of the mentally ill are in constant worry of this, knowing that the person they love could suffer from a sudden psychotic breakdown and put their lives at risk without realizing it. The fact that the mentally ill cannot control themselves and may engage in criminal activity as a result has led a struggle for police departments as people who are unaware of their actions - essentially innocent people - are killed. Through an effective argument that utilizes multiple appeals, Pete Earley suggests the necessity of special police forces to handle mentally ill suspects.…

    • 1080 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate in all of the world. (Lee, Michelle Ye Hee) This statistic is simply startling taking into consideration that the United States does not have the highest population. In the total population of inmates contained in the United States, about 356,000 suffer from severe mental illness (Torrey EF, Zdanowicz MT, Kennard AD et al.)…

    • 1335 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The New Asylums Essay

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages

    After viewing “The New Asylums”, there are many systematic problems, societal shifts, and/or changes in policies that have contributed to “The New Asylums”. One of the main societal shifts that have contributed to the “The New Asylums” is the nation’s shut down of psychiatric centers. This led to the police department to handle the mentally ill that were left on the streets leading to many arrests. However, a prison’s function is not to treat mentally ill patients; their role in society is to provide safety and security to the community. Nonetheless, the prisons do provide many services and treatments to accommodate the mentally ill.…

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    On average, twenty percent of inmates in jails and fifteen percent of inmates in prisons have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness (Z. K. Torrey). In comparison, there are ten times less mentally ill individuals residing in psychiatric institutions than there are in prisons. The fact that the correctional system has become the primary treatment for the mentally ill should be deeply concerning to not only those affected by mental illness, but all of…

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is one of the critical issues in corrections. That is the mentally ill inmates. The characteristics, adjustments, and help they go through while they're in the correctional system. The Characteristics and Challenges that Mentally ill offenders face. For starters they can be a Danger to themselves and others.…

    • 439 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mental Illness In Jails

    • 498 Words
    • 2 Pages

    In that case, with the obstacles the police faces when dealing with mental illness situations, there are two serious issues appears from the current state of criminalization with someone having a mental illness and injury or death as a result of their contact with the police. As noted, officers are in the position to be first responders to serious mental health emergencies; police intervention accounts for a significant amount of referrals into care estimates of 15-40% of the mentally disordered is currently in jails and prisons (Adelman, 2003). Majority of arrest of mentally ill people are for non-serious crimes such as minor theft, noise or disruptions complaints, failure to appear in court following other charges that was either directly or indirectly related to their illness. A study by Rogers, suggest that lack of advance knowledge of mental illness was a contributing factor to arrest (1990). As a result, an arrest was often the only step available for officers in situation where individuals were not sufficiently disturbed too be accepted by hospitals but were too public in their deviance to be ignored.…

    • 498 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The amount of individual that go through the criminal justice system that have a mental illness has become a growing issue in the criminal justice system. Many individual that enter the criminal justice system are bound to end up in prison, where they have little access to mental health help. The amount of individual that enter the criminal justice system that have a serious mental illness is estimated to be 16.9 percent. These individuals are usually repeat offenders that circulate through the system because they do not receive the treatment that they need. (Almquist & Dodd, 2009).…

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays

Related Topics