Mental Illness And Crime Research Paper

Improved Essays
Running head: Mental Illness and Crime

Mental Illness And Correspondence To Crime
Daniel Costeira
Criminolgy CRM 360 Dr. Jaeckle Flagler College Abstract
Individuals with mental illness affect the United States criminal justice system, as at least one quarter of the general population, including those in prisons, jails, or on probations is mentally diseased. Most inmates have reported symptoms or a history of a mental health disorder. There are concerns regarding the growing population of the mentally afflicted and the significant need for treatment within in system. The well being of mentally ill individuals who are involved within institutions is being questioned along with the quality of safety that is provided within facilities.
…show more content…
The Consensus Project produced a study that depicts “police departments of U.S. cities with a population greater than 100,000, approximately 7 percent of all police contacts, both investigation and complaints, involved a person believed to have a mental illness” (Council of State Governments, 2002). Law enforcement officials constantly have to put themselves in harms way when handling incidents with mentally ill offenders. In year 1998, “mentally ill offenders killed law enforcement officers at a rate five and a half times greater than that of the rest of the population” (Council of State Governments, 2002). Emotionally disturbed persons compromise the safety of many, while many are compromising theirs as …show more content…
It is an example of law enforcement–based specialized response model. Until the CIT was developed, most basic law enforcement training referred to mentally ill individuals as emotionally disturbed people (EDP for short) and gave very basic instruction on the dangers officer’s would face encountering such individuals. This further training has actually led to a decrease in injuries to either party, and dropping rates of incarceration compared to the past. “Across the country, probation and parole officials are working with jail and prison admin¬istrators, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and community based treatment providers to develop strategies that maintain public safety while improving outcomes for people with mental illnesses under community corrections supervision. But all too often, these responses are not backed by research or data, and as a result, may be less sustainable, and successful than those that incorporates interventions”. (Prin, S. J., & Draper, L

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    In fact majority of reoffenders are those with problems with substance abuse or another mental illness (Anestis et. al). If recidivism rates are affected by the mental ill in prison how effective is just punishment and incarceration? If they are suffering from a mental disorder how does the criminal justice system handle these offenders? There is criticism of imprisonment, a few believe it has begun to lose effectiveness according to the research of Dr. Gamo.…

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Mental illness has been known to be a major cause of homelessness with 150,000 to 200,000 of the 744,000 homeless populations having untreated psychiatric illnesses (Markowitz, 2006). Homeless people are one of the largest groups of people police officers encounter who have mental health problems.…

    • 1137 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Mental Health Disorders

    • 2011 Words
    • 9 Pages

    In the United States patients with mental illnesses are treated in a very primal and unfair manner. Furthermore, these sufferers of mental health disorders are subjected to violence in their daily lives. Not only can a sufferer become violent at any times, but when put around other sufferers the problems that can arise are limited. On the streets, violence is at an all time high where people suffering from a mental illness are either the perpetrators or victims. According to a recent article by CBC News “a police report called Vancouver 's Mental Health Crisis noted a 43 per cent increase in the past three years in admissions to St. Paul 's Hospital because of severe mental illness”(Proctor 2).…

    • 2011 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Treatment of Mentally Ill Offenders There is a major issue with the mental health treatment in our society. With much of America increasingly being diagnosed with a mental illness, it is still a much stigmatized disease. It is estimated that one out of every five Americans have been diagnosed with a mental disorder ranging from mild to severe. Yet, the extent of therapy and support programs available for the mentally ill is considerably insufficient. Deinstitutionalization ultimately had a negative impact on our society and was responsible in criminalizing the mentally ill.…

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Hart-Kerkhoffs decided to study the frequency of mental disorders in a particular type of juvenile offenders, sexual offenders in relationship to the recidivism rate. Two separate groups of juvenile offenders, one with child victims, and the other with teen or adult victims were studied, and of these groups 75% of them were found to have a mental disorder (Hart-Kerkhoffs, 2015). This shows the overwhelming rate of mental disorders amongst juvenile offenders, even finding more than one disease in many offenders. Additionally, two thirds of the youths were functionally weakened (Hart-Kerkhoffs, 2015). It is even estimated that a significant of rapes are committed juveniles, so that “26% of all sex offenders… and 36% of all sex offenders with juvenile victims were minors” (Hart-Kerkhoffs, 2015).…

    • 1644 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    It is paramount in the restorative justice movement that offenders meet their clients and see the damage that offending has caused to their victims. Furthermore, the movement suggests that it is important to provide mental health treatment to those offenders who are in need in order to help these offenders better adjust to society (Van Ness, Carleson Jr., & Strong 1989). It should be noted that mental health courts, and the restorative justice movement are relatively young and have only recently become popular. Thus, the research base is extremely limited. Due to limited sample sizes most of the reviewed studied do not meticulously define type of mental health treatment and diagnoses.…

    • 1671 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The most common mental illness in the prison is anxiety, anti-social personal disorder, post-traumatic disorder, and bipolar disorder. In 1998, 238,000 mentally ill offenders were incarcerated in the prisons and jails. State prison inmates with a mental condition were more likely to be incarcerated for violent offenses than other inmates for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the offense. Some of these offenders might have been homeless and lived on the dangerous streets before they were incarcerated. They were incarcerated because they might have committed murder,…

    • 512 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Criminal offenders are carry a stigma of being bad people, so they are often neglected and assumed as immoral rational beings. Unfortunately, there are cases in which these offenders suffer from mental illness which may have played a role in their deviant behavior. Approximately 14-16% of the 7.3 million people in correctional facilities suffer from serious mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar or major depression. (Peterson et al. 439) This article had two aims: to examine how often psychiatric symptoms relate to crimes and to test whether the relationship between symptoms and crimes is consistently amongst offenders.…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mental Illness In Prisons

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Every so often mental illness may run in families, which suggests that people who have a family member with a mental illness may be at risk to develop one themselves. Severe mental illnesses, like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are brain diseases and biological conditions like heart disease or epilepsy. Instead of treating these unfortunate individuals with compassion they are more likely to incarcerate the mentally ill in correctional institutions rather than treating them in health care facilities like any other sick individuals. In 2012, there were roughly 356,268 inmates with severe mental illnesses in prisons and jails, while only 35,000 people with the same diseases were in state psychiatric hospitals (Mencimer,…

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    When mentally ill people are incarcerated, prisons can play a big role in the negative side of there attitude. The overcrowding, violence, lack of privacy, isolation from social media, and insecurity of future, work and relationships (Jonathan). These characteristics offline lead to things that are worse than just a longer sentencing. Most people die by suicide within the first few days of entering (Arboleda-Florez). Although there are plenty of negative things, there are also several positive sides to being in…

    • 1864 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays

Related Topics