The Bystander Effect

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The definition of the bystander effect is as followed: a social psychological phenomenon that refers to cases in which individuals do not offer any means of help to a victim when other people are present. The probability of help is inversely related to the number of bystanders. Social interactions can influence the way people react to a certain situation. Conformity also plays a major part in the bystander effect as well as sterotypes; it influences the way people react when they see other people reacting. Why do individuals not offer any means of help to a victim when others are present and what are the negative influences by social interactions due to conformity as well as the diffusion of responsibility in a certain situation? Empathy …show more content…
The most notorious example of the Bystander Effect is the case of Kitty Genovese.
“On March 13, 1964, Kitty Genovese was murdered in front of her home. She parked her car a number of feet from her apartment when all of a sudden, a man named Winston Moseley chased her down and stabbed her in the back twice. Due to the excruciating pain, Kitty screamed for help and a neighbor responded shouting at the criminal "Let that girl alone!"Immediately after getting the attention of the criminal, Winston fled the scene and left the girl crawling towards
…show more content…
It goes on every day, and it can be prevented. It is very dangerous because it could lead to an injury to a victim or even death, like Kitty Genovese as an example. Most people will come across a situation in their life and they will demonstrate the bystander effect even if they do not even know it. In order to stop by bystander effect there are several steps we need to take: discourage victim blaming, shifting responsibility and to change social normality. These ideas and actions can help prevent the bystander effect. “ Stop potential incidents before they occur, educate yourself and others, talk to and support your friends so that they will intervene as well! The best way bystanders can assist in creating an empowering climate free of interpersonal violence is to diffuse the problem behaviors before they escalate” (Merritt). The bystander effect can be prevented, people just need to be aware of their surroundings and the situations that unfold in front of

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