May 4th Movement Research Paper

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When being a leader of a country, people would think that they are doing everything they can to make sure their country is leading in the right direction without others influences coming inside. China during the 18th century to mid-20th century had a lot of concerns, but the main concern that would be at the forefront would be the decline the people and the leaders saw that their country were headed to. From doing research I would say that the decline of china would have to be caused by the western powers being involved in china. Some of the causes that the western power did to make China have its decline would include the opium wars, the May 4th movement and lastly the rebellions in china. All three of these had some effect on how china …show more content…
The May 4th movement was where a group of students went on protest about the issues of anti- imperialist, cultural and political movements that were happening in china. Student protested about the Chinese weak response to the treaty of Versailles, especially with Japan gains lands in china, which included Shandong. This was a western power control of china decline because with the western territories getting involved with World War 1, china soon lost some territories to their enemies nearby them, which was Japan because China did not want Japan to be involved in their country. The document THE EARLY TWEIENTH CENTURY states, “college students and their supporters protested Japan’s imperialist advances and their own government’s weakness, arousing in the process the patriotic and reformist spirit of a generation of young people” . This quote shows the reader that the western powers were part of the reason that the Japan’s imperialist were able to take control of cities in china. Not only was this seen, but with the western …show more content…
The Miao movement happened because the long standing ethic tension with the hand chinses, poor administration, grinding poverty, and growing competition for land in china. The rebellion stemmed from a variety of grievances, including long-standing ethnic tensions with Han Chinese, poor administration, grinding poverty and growing competition for arable land. This would lead to western power take over because once again china was seen as not being able to control the problem they had in their country, and because western powers were already moving in on getting land that was in china.
In conclusion the western powers led to the downfall of china because of rebellions that constantly happened in china, the May 4th movement, and last but not least the opium wars. All three of these factories have some type of influence or way that china was going to downfall. The opium wars, let foreign powers have control in certain areas. The May 4th movement was a protest about how people wanted foreign control to be removed from their country and rebellions made china look as if they did not have control of their country and made western powers see their weak

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