Male-Female Relationships In Trifles By Susan Glaspell

Decent Essays
Register to read the introduction… Hale and Mrs. Peters also have a kinship to Minnie, just as to each other. They respect her work as a homemaker. Mrs. Hale quickly comes to Minnie's defense when her housekeeping skills are questioned, saying, "'There's a great deal of work to be done on a farm'" (1326). The women display their loyalty to each other and their sympathy for one another, too. Mrs. Peters can identify with the loneliness and sadness of losing something you love. She understands "'what stillness is,'" and Mrs. Hale knows "'how things can be--for women . . . [they] all go through the same things--it's just a different kind of the same thing'" (1333). These women are obviously united, and together they have a common enemy, as it were. The women’s foes, the men, are not united at all. The county attorney, in particular, is in a rush to find evidence. He hurries Mr. Hale through his story with, "'Lets talk about that later . . . tell now just what happened when you got to the house'" (1325). Then he ushers the other two men up the stairs, unthinkingly neglecting the crucial evidence …show more content…
To them it is of little importance as they say, “’Nothing here but kitchen things’” (1326). Instead of looking at things of the wife, who is in custody, they search all through John’s bed, barn, and other male things for evidence. The women regard these men, between themselves, as "'snooping around and criticizing'" (1327) and as sarcastic. Everywhere it is apparent how condescending the men are as well. Mrs. Hale and, especially, Mrs. Peters are underestimated. Mr. Peters, the sheriff, is of the opinion that "'anything Mrs. Peters does'll be alright,'" and later the attorney concurs, "'Mrs. Peters doesn't need supervising.'" (1327,

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