Mahatma Karachand Gandhi: The Struggle Of Civil Disobedience In South Africa

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“An eye for an eye only ends up making the world blind” Mahatma Karachand Gandhi or simply known as “Gandhi” was a revered activist in Indian immigration in South Africa within the early 1900s. He dedicated the greater part of his life to civil rights within his country and gradually worked up to influencing the world. Gandhi became a leading model in expressing India’s struggle with Britain and challenged authority in several accounts. He’s fought against the masses with the help of his supporters and undertook the effects that had come after. Gandhi was born in Porbondar India but moved to Rajkot at the age of seven, and was the youngest of his four other siblings. Gandhi’s childhood consisted of strict beliefs and complete order. However, …show more content…
He was ridiculed and known as the “unwanted visitor” by British authorities. He continuously went through this treatment until his breaking point when he was on a trip to Pretoria and was forcedly removed and thrown off a train. He considered this to be an “act of civil disobedience” and is what led him to begin his seminal movement and fight for “the deep disease of color prejudice”. After his yearlong contract was over Mahatma choose to stay in Africa to fight against the legislation with the help of his fellow immigrants. Gandhi promoted self-reliance in order to gain freedom from the British yet controlling the large scale protest was beginning to become violent and completely went against all he stood for. “I wish to change their minds, not kill them for weaknesses we all poses.” He spent much of the 1920s engaging in peaceful protest and even went onto fasting as “penance for violence” this was done frequently. He did this for 21 days as a means of bringing the two communities together “naturally” and almost died while doing so “I am prepared to die, but there is no cause for which I am prepared to kill”. At this point he became a leading advocate in the nonviolent fight for Indian independence. One of his most renowned acts was leading a mass boycott against all British goods and while it did provide jobs and an actual place for Indian …show more content…
However, He still kept to his humble life of no electricity and running water. Gandhi did this because leaders began to fight only for the power rather than for the interest of the people, he promised to return when India earned its independence. In 1942 the British got involved in World War II and included India without their consent to fight alongside. “Nobody can hurt me without my permission”. In response to this he gave a speech insisting that all Indians sacrifice their lives for freedom and led several more protests. After his attempts to avoid the war Gandhi was sentenced to seven years in prison for sedition but was released after two because of an illness from fasting. By 1947 India gained its independence from Britain. “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win”. In 1948 Gandhi led his last hunger strike 12 days after their independence, it was dedicated to the death of one million people during the war. On his way to sign the treaty to declare peace between both societies, he was shot by a Hindu radical his last words were Hey Ram which means

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