The Role Of Literacy In Children

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Literacy can be defined as the flexible and sustainable mastery to make meaning with texts of traditional and new communication technologies through spoken language, print and multi-media (Rush, 2004). There are many different literacy theories but one that is widely used in Australia curriculum is called the four resources model introduced by Luke and Freeboy in 1990, which includes multi-literacies framework that supports children on their reading and writing development. According to Luke and Freeboy, children need four practices in order to be an effective reader and writer, which are code breaker, text participants, text user, and text analyst. To be a successful code breaker, children need to be able to recognize the fundamental features …show more content…
Children’s personal experiences and background, including cultures, families or communities can directly affect their semantic competence (Honan, 2004). This is because in order to construct their own meaning, children need to integrate their knowledge, compare and relate their previous personal experiences with the texts (Honan, 2004). I highly agreed that different assumed knowledge, interests and lifestyles influence the way children interpret words, clauses, sentences and texts as it is evident in the childcare centre I worked at. During ANZAC day, I was reading story to the children to help them understand the significance meaning behind ANZAC day, and some children already understand the purpose of it but some children from another background have not heard of it. It shows me that different cultural background or assumed knowledges can lead to a different understanding of text at different level of comprehension (Honan, …show more content…
Even at a young age, children started understand the functions of texts and it happened along phonics instructions, sight words and other reading and writing strategies (Rush, 2004). I’ve learned that by using four resources model, educator can constantly evaluate and plan their program and monitor children’s reading and writing development. Experimental reading and writing is the first stage of children’s reading and writing development (Fitzgerald & Shanahan, 2000). At this stage, children started noticing environmental print and show interest in book, especially picture book. They started pretending to read, make up stories using picture cues and started identify some letter names (Fitzgerald & Shanahan, 2000). Children can also distinguish the differences between writing and drawing, write letters in forms of scribble and develop an understanding of reading flow and direction. At this stage, children can read and write 5-20 familiar or high frequency words (Fitzgerald & Shanahan, 2000). This is a sign of children developing code breaking skills and educator can use the model to further developed their code breaking skills or determine what is the child lack

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