John Stuart Mill Vs Tocqueville

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John Stuart Mill and Alexis de Tocqueville, both were advocates for individual freedom, and liberty through democracy. Mill and Tocqueville both feared tyranny, and promoted democracy so that citizens could have individual liberties, and thoughts. Mill’s ideal citizen in a democracy would be participatory, and opinionated in their beliefs. His citizen would not curtail any other citizen’s belief, no matter how far off of their beliefs it is. Tocqueville’s ideal citizen would be one who participates at a local level of politics. In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill stated, “Society can and does execute its own mandates, practicing a social tyranny more formidable than many kinds of political oppression” (Mill76). Meaning in democracy, there does …show more content…
They would strive for happiness for themselves, and for the democracy as a whole. Tocqueville thought for a successful democracy, citizens must keep the greater good in line with their own interest. They would keep in mind of their actions, if they would be beneficial to themselves as an individual, and to society as a whole. Mill and Tocqueville both agreed with the notion of individualism, and allowing individuals to think, and to form opinions, and to carry out their opinions without hindrance from anyone. They both advocated for individual freedom and expression. Mill backed self-progression over group-progression, not to harm fellow citizens, but to uphold the idea of individual freedom. Mill thought as long as it was not at the cost of a fellow citizen, then the individual’s interests may surpass the interests of the whole, in search of individual liberty. Mill wanted citizens to support society as a whole similar to Tocqueville, however Mill thought individualism was more important than the greater good. Tocqueville thought the greater good should be upheld alongside, or before individualism. Mill’s ideal citizen is more likely than Tocqueville’s ideal citizen. Mainly because humans are inherently selfish. In a democracy, citizens do care for their fellow man, however it is not likely to find an individual to put aside their individual goals, to help achieve society’s goals. They may help society as a whole, next to achieving their individual goals, yet their individual goals would be higher on their priorities. Tocqueville’s citizen is not as likely as Mill’s because Tocqueville’s citizen is somewhat selfless, putting others before

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