The Crucible Irony Analysis

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Although irony is used throughout “The Crucible”, it is often mistaken or confused for other literary devices. Irony is words that are usually the opposite of their usual meaning. Authors use irony in their novels to catch reader’s attention and cause suspense. Irony is used so that you cannot always predict the end of the book. Irony is used many ways In “The Crucible” along with literature. Readers may have trouble identifying the differences between the literary devices and confuse irony for something else.
Irony is the concept of written or spoken words that generally mean the opposite of their usual meaning. It will lead you thinking one thing, but in the end it could be different. It adds an extra interest when you are reading. “When
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A lot of people confuse irony for being a coincidence, in which an event that happens is not expected or planned. A coincidence can be very similar to irony in reading because some readers may look at it the same way, when really a coincidence is unplanned. Irony isn’t a coincidence because the narrator usually plans what will happen so it is a surprise for readers. People can easily mistake the term metaphor for irony because it’s an elaborate way of expressing something. “Anyone who tries to define irony is asking for trouble. The subject of many excellent books and articles, irony has been variously and profusely analyzed that some critics are now reluctant to consider it at all, preferring to regard it rather as a temporary literary obsession or as a modern concept almost totally irrelevant to medieval poetry.” (Rowland). Beryl Rowland explains how irony can be a difficult topic to explain and talk about. She says it is so profusely analyzed that critics are reluctant considering it at all. Authors aren’t always positive about using it in their stories. A lot of authors use different types of irony to get the readers attached, so they will want to keep reading. It is often mistaken because irony is very similar to other literary devices. The way to notice the differences is to really read it over and think about the other similar literature. Irony is more misleading from the beginning rather then being a

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