Importance Of The Emancipation Proclamation

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The Emancipation Proclamation would stand to set into motion one of the greatest impacts on American culture begging post Civil War era until the Civil Rights Act of 65 Structured by President John F. Kennedy, signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The Proclamation itself took roughly three years to finalize into the constitution. The first step was taken in July 1862 when congress placed two laws into action, “a second confiscation act that freed slaves of persons who had engaged in rebellion against the United States, and a militia act that empowered the president to use freed slaves in the army in any capacity he saw fit—even as soldiers”. (The Readers Companion to American History, 1991) This would be his first step. After Lincoln had …show more content…
Finally on December 18, 1865 congress established the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery in the US forever more. This Constitutional right provided primarily for African Americans at the time of the US harboring slavery, set into motion what many more men and woman would continue to fight for until the Civil Rights Act of 64 when not only would slavery be unconstitutional, but men and women all races and ethnicities would have equal right forever more. The momentum set forth by President Lincoln took almost 100 more years to complete, other than the creation of history itself for the US has any cultural influences taken so long to achieve its totality in the US …show more content…
The US Spends far more then it brings in. Evaluating the direct correlation between the cost and affects of wartime in the US on the economy and on the public being stable enough to sustain itself with an unstable government spending poorly and fighting freely, if the US stopped participating in any sort of conflict today, it would take more than 25 years to relieve the nation of its debt. The US has not gone more than a decade without wartime since the Northern American continent was discovered by explorers. The Financial issues of the US are irreparable at this point given the norms of the US culture today and the spoils of the Suites who run the country. The only resource left that the government has left for war that it can do with whatever it see’s fit, are human resources. Humans, outside of the inclination of genocidal events, are renewable. In the eyes of a government that delegates its own value and worth, the human is a disposable resource at that. During the American Civil War, the South wanted to keep their slaves, or at least avoid being sanctioned by a government to which they had not been established a state of. That government in turn, to free slaves who already have food, clothing, and shelter, as well as their army outnumbered the Southern armed forces by two to one. The Union commanded over 2 million soldiers to defeat the

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