Emergence Of Cities Essay

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From the transition of the Neolithic era to the early agrarian era to the late agrarian era, populations increased, inventions continued to be created, and technologies advanced. Humans began to live an agricultural lifestyle which began in living in villages, villages became towns and towns became cities. The emergence of cities gave human history a new threshold of complexity. The textbook “Big History: Between Nothing and Everything” describes thresholds of complexity as a point where new and more entities emerged with new properties making the universe more complex. Yet, the question remains, should cities be considered as a threshold of complexity? The emergence of cities should be considered a new threshold of complexity because it brought …show more content…
Around 3600 BCE the city of Uruk developed in the river valleys of Mesopotamia. Uruk attracted migrations of bordering neighbors and made possible, for the first time in history, the growing of surplus food, populations rapidly increased and as collective management became more advanced, a process of urbanization evolved and Sumerian civilization took root (Mark). Prior to Uruk, our universe had seen nothing like this unification. Years later, cities from all over the world developed and took on the agricultural lifestyle. In about 3100 BCE, the city of Nubia appeared in Egypt around the Nile River. Due to the Nile River, Nubia had extremely fertile soil, allowing them to flourish as a city. By about 2000 BCE, China’s two river valleys developed their own cities: Huang He Valley and the Chang Jiang River Valley. The Qin and Han Dynasties gave China unified rule and supported twenty percent of the world’s population (Christian, Brown, Benjamin). The Olmec and Mayans gave Mesoamerica their first cities around 1000 BCE. The greatest phenomenon of the emergence of cities is that, at many different locations in different climates all over the world, cities were emerging and humans were adapting agriculture all at about the same time. This indicates that humans were taking on a new level of

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