Aboriginal Literature

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HOW SHOULD ONE APPROACH ABORIGINAL LITERATURES?

Abstract The paper helps the readers in understanding of Aboriginal issues. It increases the readers’ awareness and understanding of the history, cultures, world views, and contributions of Indigenous peoples in Canada. It enables the readers examine the history, the diversity of cultural, linguistic, racial, and religious of groups of First Nations peoples in Canada, and it exhorts the readers to prepare themselves to live harmoniously in a multicultural society in the interdependent world of the twenty-first century.
Key Words: “Indians” “Aboriginal,” “Indigenous” and First Nations” are used interchangeably with “Native.”
Introduction
Canada is the land of origin for Aboriginal peoples,
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The readings of literatures from different Aboriginal cultures characterize a nation. With a very few exceptions, English curricula do not include First Nations literatures and although these works could also be part of the English courses so that students can learn about First Nations voices. Aboriginal students deserve to be taught texts they can relate to their culture and non-Aboriginal students should be educated about Aboriginal culture, history and contemporary life through the richness of Aboriginal writings with its innovative uses of the English …show more content…
The Aboriginal literatures are also pertinent to all Aboriginal cultures in Canada and around the world, and even further, they are also pertinent to all peoples universally. Indigenous writing emphasizes commonalities because the writers come from diverse regions, cultures, and histories. What the entire galaxy of Aboriginal writers share is their connections to their homelands, their histories of colonization, genocide, and displacement and their will to survive and pass the treasures of their cultures to future generations.
In order to address some of the challenges on the road to Aboriginal literatures published in English, the teachers, the researchers, and the students may discuss the well-known poem “I Lost My Talk” by Rita Joe. This text may be taught either in a specific Mi’kmaq context or as an introduction to Aboriginal writing, as the points about loss of language/culture/identity and voice in residential schools pertains to all indigenous cultures in Canada. “I Lost My

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