Imperialism Vs Spanish Colonization Essay

Improved Essays
England provided ideal circumstances for its colonizing empire. A population spike, religious dissensions, and economic opportunity motivated people to emigrate to the West. National greed, nationalism, and rivalry with Spain led royalty to pursue colonies. The colonizing drive helped provide an essential, much-needed component of imperial mercantilism. Truly, the English incorrectly thought that their imperialism was more “enlightened” than Spain’s conquest for “gold, God, and glory.”
To begin, English treatment of Native Americans mirrored the Spanish. English and Spanish settlers almost always brewed up contempt between themselves and the natives. The closer natives lived to foreigners, the more likely conflict grew. Both countries tried
…show more content…
The Spaniards came to the Americas for “gold, God, and glory.” Moreover, the British came to America for the same reasons: the British came because of the presumed abundance of natural resources, or “gold;” they came because of religion, or for “God;” they came to expand their empire, or for “glory.” Great Britain came to America precisely for what Spain came for.
Differences between the creation of English and Spanish colonies were few to none. While Spain’s colonization did go about as a conquest, England’s colonization had been simply just that, colonization. In fact, England had promoted all kinds of civilians to take up residence in their colonies, from criminals to Puritans. Nevertheless, the effects of their colonizing were similar, if not identical.
Englishmen pilgrimaging to America, whether Puritan, Protestant, Baptist, Catholic, or Quaker, differed the only minusculely from Spaniards’ robust Catholicism when concerning what to do with pagan ideas. Often, religious attempts of converting and subverting other creeds failed and ended with violently hazardous bigotry. Once again, the English failed to separate their own actions from their supposed Spanish

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The conversions of the Spanish were mainly how they planned to control this hemisphere (“Exploration-Conquest-the-Spanish” www.thehistorylounge.org). The Spanish colonies were largely based on trading. There was minimal farming in the West, but it was encouraged by the Spanish military. In the late 1400’s, the king of Spain sent conquistadors to the New World to conquer land and obtain wealth and gold. This was not only very successful, but due to the success, it encouraged other European powers to send colonies to North America and form permanent colonies there (slideplayer.com).…

    • 502 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Age Of Discovery Essay

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The more land a person owned, the more wealth and power that person had. European rulers, like the King of Spain and the King of Portugal, wanted to claim as much land as possible and use the people that originally lived there as slaves. Some countries would literally do anything to possess more land. They believed that glory was to be found in the adventure and in the land they hoped to claim. Their dream was to no longer be poor sailors and become wealthy lords that were well-known among the people.…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In 1492, Christopher Columbus landed on the North American coast while searching for a new route to the Indies on behalf of the Spanish crown. After his unwitting discovery of the New World, European countries flocked to claim the land - first Spain and Portugal, then the English, French and Dutch. As colonies popped up all over North America, these countries gradually discovered great wealth in agriculture and trade. However, the land was already occupied by Native American tribes who, while not initially hostile, did not intend to give up their claims to the Europeans. The settlers became more wealthy and established, and as they did so, they became increasingly arrogant towards the Native Americans.…

    • 1226 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After hearing tales of Spanish successes, the English were unsatisfied with simply looting their opponent’s ships. Furthermore, the country had just emerged from an intense civil battle between Protestants and Catholics. It ultimately became a Protestant state with a fierce hatred of Catholicism, which Spain embodied in English eyes. In fact, one main reason for its imperialism was to spread its religious doctrine. Moreover, after defeating the Spanish Armada, Englishmen felt invincible and adventurous, ready to explore new worlds.…

    • 1058 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Native American Greed

    • 1209 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Columbus’ accidental discovery of the New World in 1492 marked a turning point in the race against European countries for wealth. As a result of his journey, European explorers set out to claim land in the New World, thus increasing initial competition. The New World provided not only natural resources and new beginnings for the Europeans, but also an increasing hunger for power and dominance. This growing desire was primarily underscored by the contact between the Native Americans and Europeans, as European settlers intruded with Christianity and their strong sense of superiority over the Natives. Consequent to this contact, Europeans enjoyed their gained personal profit from their newfound land by exploiting the Native Americans through enslavement;…

    • 1209 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They had much more freedom than the Spanish, and supported immigration from other countries which increased their colonial population. The English and Spanish differences during the Age of Exploration within their government, religion, and economy led to many advantages and disadvantages that changed the New World’s fate. The Spanish were the first to arrive to North America, and mainly wanted to explore. They were motivated by gold, glory, and god. Their government was tight, watched strictly, and rich.…

    • 629 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Defense of the Indians was written by Bartolomé de las Casaś. Around the time he wrote this excerpt, Spaniards like King Charles of Spain wanted to increase their wealth by going to the New World which was said to have abundances of good and unknown resources. Now those of Catholic faith saw fault in these prospects which would include the disturbance and corruption of the ideals natives held. People of Spain saw the Indians a savage, barbaric, incapable to learn and evolve among the knowledge and governed laws. However in the excerpt by las Casaś, he argues that Indians really were civilized but not by the terms of which the Spaniards knew.…

    • 502 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Americans wanted to solve their own problems. This is what angered them in the sudden taxes imposed by Britain. Americans were fond of salutary neglect, where the British allow the Americans to govern their everyday affairs while Britain manages the international affairs. The new taxes, which went to fund European wars, threatened this way of life the Americans had grown accustomed to. Even this, Neo-Whigs argue, was not the whole cause.…

    • 1016 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    But due to the war with Spain, this colony failed. Next, England attempted to colonize again, calling this settlement Jamestown. The Virginia Company thought that Jamestown would be a great investment, although the settlement did not draw much profit. Just like the agreement between John Cabot and Henry VII, a portion of all goods must be imported back to England. The Native Americans and the colonists did not have a peaceful relationship.…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    While Spain and British colonization efforts both began with the goal of finding new wealth, they differed in their religious aspects and their treatment of the native people. Spain and England were both enticed by the promise of wealth in the New World. Columbus ' discovery and exaggeration of the gold he found led to several other Spanish voyages across the Atlantic Sea. The idea of "God, Gold, and Glory" inspired the conquistadores, including Pizarro and Cortés. For example, Pizarro conquered the Inca…

    • 1255 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays