Identity In J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan

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The One who was “Gay and Innocent and Heartless”

“They are, however, allowed to change, only it must be a complete change”-J.M. Barrie In Peter Pan Wendy Darling dreamed of a place called Neverland and a heroic boy who never grew up, Peter Pan. When her dreams became reality, her location, experiences, and family made her identity change due to these forces. In the book Peter Pan written by J. M Barrie, many forces change the identity of Wendy Darling. Being in a different location, Neverland, her experiences while living there, and being separated from her parents, but being with her “sons”, changed Wendy Darling’s identity.
Wendy Darling changed from when she first met Peter Pan, to after where she had been in the location of Neverland for quite some time. ”There are zigzag lines on it, just
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In England Wendy lived with her brothers and parents, but in Neverland, she was mother to the lost boys and her brothers. “There never was a simpler happier family until the coming of Peter Pan” (5; Ch. 1). Wendy’s mother and father were not big fans of Peter Pan; in fact, they did not want their children to be speaking of Peter Pan. When Peter came into the nursery that one night, Mrs. Darling was furious. In Neverland Wendy had forgotten about her parents, but when her memory kicked back in, she decided she needed to go home. Before Wendy left, she was the mother of the lost boys. The reason why Peter brought Wendy to Neverland was because the lost boys needed a mother and wanted her to tell them stories. They changed her in a way where she learned what it was like being a mother of a large family. “‘Dear Peter,’ she said, ‘with such a large family, of course, I have now passed my best, but you don’t want to change me, do you?’” (100; Ch. 10). With Wendy being both a mother and a daughter of a family, she has changed due to her episodes with both

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