How Did The Weather Cause The Dust Bowl

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The U.S. had major problems in the 1930’s and 40’s.Weather is what caused the dust bowl.

Farmers had major struggles from the dry weather and dust storms.“Farmers and landholders in the Great Plains had to migrate in the 1930s during a period of drought, irregular rain, and erosion.”"Sander"All farming was ruined because of the weather farmers couldn't grow crops and the topsoil was ruined.They moved west to California where conditions would be better and tried to restart there.Weather was so miserable that people had to farm in a suitcase or all your crops world get ruined from the thick black dust."The Dust Bowl" .For farmers who stayed and did not move they farmed in suitcases.They would put new soil in them and do what they would do normally
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“Extreme weather conditions during the Dust Bowl or the “Dirty Thirties” was so severe that dust traveled over 1,000 miles from the Oklahoma panhandle. Therefore, the effect of the “Dust Bowl” was being felt in various parts of the country, and problems were not necessarily unique to Midwestern states. A New York Times article on May 12, 1934 had this headline: “Huge Dust Cloud, Blown 1,500 Miles, Dims City for 5 Hours.” Ships 300 miles off the eastern shore even reported dust on their decks. These storms got various nicknames such as “rollers” or “Black Blizzards” (Wineburg, et. al 2013).”"Sander"The dust was so treacherous it was causing most places in the U.S. to have black and or dark skies.The people named them black blizzards because the sky would be so dark and because it was like a blizzard of dust.It didn't matter how far away someone was either because the dust still got to ships and affected them from 1000 plus miles away.“After a “Black Blizzard” blotted out the midday sun in New York and Washington DC in April of 1935, Congress declared soil erosion a national menace.”"Zimmerman".The dust eventually got to Washington D.C. and New York and made these big cities black, it caused the president to make an announcement across the U.S. that it was a harm.“These choking billows of dust – called "black blizzards" or "black rollers" – traveled cross country, reaching as far as the East Coast and striking such cities as New York City and Washington, D.C. On the Plains, they often reduced visibility to 1 metre (3.3 ft) or less.”"Dust Bowl"The black skies caused people who lived in the plains to only be able to see 3.3 feet in front of them.The topsoil is what was causing this.As the wind was picking the unanchored soil up it was making the skies dark by blowing dirt around.During the day and the hours of sunlight no one would even know because the dirt would make it darker than night.“On

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