Massachusetts Bay Colony

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Province of Massachusetts
Originally Massachusetts was an English colony in North America, founded in 1628, by a group of puritans escaping persecution, until 1961 when it became the Province of Massachusetts and in 1776 seceded from England to be one of the original 13 states of America. The name Massachusetts comes from the Indian tribe, the Massachusett, an Algonquian tribe living in the area of Massachusetts bay. “at the great hill” or “at the range of hills” is its translation, referring to the Blue hills which are a chain of mountains, with a bluish hue, running through Massachusetts.
Provincial charter
The joint monarchs of England, Scotland, and Ireland, William, and Mary, chartered Massachusetts on October 7, 1961. Although it did not take effect until May 15, 1962.
The charter included the area of Massachusetts Bay colony, the province of Maine, Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick.
Government
The crown and not the people appointed the senior officers, although the people still elected the legislative assembly. The Governor had more power and could veto any laws passed by the general court, meaning that the crown was able to more
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Farming was the largest economic activity, fishing was important along the coastline, while trading was a very important in large cities like Boston. Most manufactured things were brought in from England until the Revolution, when Americans defied the British and opened their ports to other countries. Another flourishing industry was Shipbuilding. A large communication system in Massachusetts was newspapers, The British consequently hated them because of the outrageous and degrading things they sometimes printed about the government, the king, and British in general. Massachusetts also had the best education system in the colonies, Harvard college is still around

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