Hester And Dimmesdale In Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter

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The act of sinning is what this book is revolved around and how everyone sins. Hester and Dimmesdale both have committed the sin of adultery. While Chillingworth has committed the sin of revenge and punishing Dimmesdale physically and mentally. These sins have developed the characters in many ways.

The sin of adultery developed the character Hester as the story progresses her inner strength, her defiance of convention, her honesty, and her compassion may have been in her character all along, but the scarlet letter brings them to our attention. changed by her sin, she matures, becomes maternal. Taking care of both her child and others less fortunate in society. She brings food and clothing to the poor. Other women begin to look up to her
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He soon suspected Dimmesdale, and would not rest until got revenge on him. Chillingworth pretended to be a physician and was to take care of Dimmesdale, but at the same time he was slowly poisoning him and punishing him physically and mentally. he is less of a character and more of a symbol doing the devil's bidding. In the Conclusion, we discover that Chillingworth "positively withered up, shriveled away." Obsession, vengeance, and hatred consumed him. Chillingworth is destroyed by a sin that is more evil than any sin of passion. Even though he is obsessed with his own quilt, Dimmesdale tells Hester, in Chapter 17, "That old man's revenge has been blacker than my sin. He has violated, in cold blood, the sanctity of a human heart. Thou and I, Hester, never did so!" He understand, as Hawthorne suggests, that guilt is not just one thing, but is a product of upbringing, surrounding circumstances, and differing motives for the same actions.

In conclusion we see how Hester's character has been developed over the course of the book because off the sin she had committed. Roger Chillingworth's developed into a ruthless person because of his sin. Sin developed Dimmesdale's character because he went telling the truth to lying about his sin and just keeping it to

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