Rhetorical Analysis Of Civil Disobedience

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Henry Thoreau believes that the government must be better, not just for the majority, but for all those that are part of it. He begins his civil disobedience essay by stating, “the government is at it’s best but expedient ,” this is implying that government fails to resolve the issues that the people quickly, making whatever provided “worse than the evil.” Thoreau believes that a government runned by the majority, does not necessarily make the decision fair and just, it simply means that it is the most desired decision. And, that the minority suffers in result of that. He further explains, “government is best which governs the least… that government is best which governs not at all,” indicating to the audience that the government is not necessary …show more content…
Thureau rationalize’s that the physical portion of the government, the soldiers, armies, navy men, etc., are seen as good citizens, but are treated equal to “lumps of dirt,” and are stripped of their conscience to to yield the orders of the mental part of the government, the lawyer, politicians, etc. and in doing so he becomes a slave to the state, and insensibly commits acts of wrongs, that are justified by law, like killing. A state that is ruled by laws, instead of what is right or wrong, cannot be fair to all. Instead, it becomes an agent of corruption, that inevitably leads to an endless cycle. Thoreau believes the only way to break this vicious cycle is for all man, good, wise, and honest men, to take take matters into their hands, and silently declare war against the state. For if man takes the opinion of others, he is no better than the doings of the government. They must be moved by their own morals and their own desire for a …show more content…
He cannot accept a government that makes it right to have enslavement of not just African Americans, but of it’s citizen’s too. He urges that the people of his society must take abid to fighting against the wrong, the enslavement of Africans Americans and free all individuals of unjust laws and punishments. That better government can never be established if the people were to be lazy and give their responsibility to the majority. It is a duty for all of us to nurture our state like our parent and to make a government that ruled by our conscience, not the laws. However, Thureau understands that he can only do as far as his role, and that he cannot force this knowledge onto to others without their willingness to be aware. He acknowledges that the minority choose to be naive because knowing is a painful task, and that not everyone is ready to take such a burden. All he can do is silently declare war against the government and hope for a better

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