Greek Sculptors In The Archaic Period

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In the beginning of the Archaic Period (800-480 BCE), Greek sculptors took early inspiration from Egyptian and Near Eastern monumental art, but over time they developed their own independent artistic identity. Through many Greek sculptors we are able to examine the abandonment of the rigid and unnatural Egyptian pose, into the more realistic sculpture that portrays how a human body truly stands. Greek sculptors were particularly concerned with proportion, poise, and idealised perfection of the human body. As Greek sculptors practiced throughout the years, they were able to more accurately depict the parts of the human body in proportions related to one another, creating the beautiful Greek sculptors that we see today. Starting with the Archaic Period the main materials used for statues were stone, …show more content…
Greek Kouros were abundantly produced during the Archaic Period and were heavily influenced by Egyptian sculptures. Kouros figures were portrayed as being young, standing, often naked, and acquired many characteristics similar to Egyptian sculptures. They were approximately life size and exhibited a strict symmetry as different parts of the anatomy were created in simple geometric forms. Over time measurements of human anatomy became more accurate and the transition into realism became more evident (Kouros, 2002). By the end of the Archaic Period and into the early Classical Period a sculpture titled Kritios Boy (480 BCE) was created. Kritios Boy was carved from marble, approximately 3 feet and 10 inches in height, and was the first to portray weight shift in proportion to the human body. Never before had a sculptor been concerned

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