Gender Roles In The Great Gatsby

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There 's no doubt that in The Great Gatsby, the gender roles are somewhat differentiated between dominance of men, and independence of woman. With several theories going around as to what women are portrayed as “gentle”, and what woman are considered “tough”. Fitzgerald in truth wanted to have the woman subdued by the men with their physical and authoritative strength, where there is one case of role reversal in the case of Nick and Jordan. Here, in this essay, you will understand why the gender roles of women are seen at “pure”, “innocent”, and traditionally mannered. Although in the end, you will find out that their white dresses are only hiding who they truly are- just as tough and independently equal to men. F. Scott Fitzgerald is the …show more content…
Jordan, a woman who is in a relationship with Nick Carraway is seen as a really tough individual who throughout the story shows more power over Nick, making almost all of the decisions, and being in every scene that whenever there seems to be a problem occurring. Jordan as her name also indicates, makes her a tough woman, who doesn 't usually wear what Daisy and Myrtle would wear, and doesn 't seem to have the same body figures as Daisy and Myrtle. Even during the scene where Gatsby and Tom were arguing while Gatsby grabbed Tom 's vest, Daisy looks, and cried in fear while Jordan glared and is motionless and emotionless, sitting, merely watching the two almost kill each …show more content…
She only cares about herself and married a wealthy man to support herself. She is the epitome of a perfect Belle, but she is not a perfect person. Feminism plays into this story like an alarm clock, in only goes off at certain times. Throughout the story we see Daisy constantly changing who she loves between Tom and Gatsby, endlessly leading them on. Mocking the actions of what a man would do according to Fitzgerald: Girls were putting their heads on men 's shoulders in a puppy-ish, convivial way, girls were swooning backwards playfully into men 's arms, even into groups, knowing that someone would arrest their falls. (Fitzgerald, 41) Even though their actions show who they truly are, their attire and way of addressing people are very similar to that of men. Throwing away any femininity to their persona. All Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, and Myrtle Wilson all have the same traits. Clothes are very modern, not concerned at all with behavior in public, Jordan having a male dominated profession in Golf, Daisy being self centered and unladylike like, all having sex before marriage, and all having

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