Gender And Violence Essay

1694 Words 7 Pages
As humans, we are all susceptible to being victims of violence. However, as a society, we have created the notion that women are the people most susceptible to violence and that men are the people most likely to be the perpetrators of violence. These perceptions of the interaction between gender and violence can be seen throughout institutions in society. While it is simple to follow these notions, gendered violence and perceptions of violence are actually harmful to both men and women. In this essay, I will be using various research sources to support this and emphasize the importance of dispelling these perceptions. Jocelyn Hollander introduced two new terms to help explain how violence is gendered. When considering how violence is discussed, …show more content…
However, there was one instance in Hollander’s research where an African American woman perceived that her race made her more vulnerable. This instance highlighted a strong point for Hollander that “the effects of race are contextual: both white and Black participants felt vulnerable only in a context that highlighted their racial identity” (97). Since race is often linked with social class, one’s socioeconomic status might also be affecting their perceived vulnerability. Hollander states that one’s race and class cannot be differentiated, simply because there is a wealth connation applied to the different races. Therefore, those who identify as racial others are assumed to be of lower status and higher vulnerability. Another powerful indicator of perceived vulnerability is one’s sexual identity. Although those who identify outside of being straight do feel more vulnerable because of their sexual identity, there are still differences in vulnerability based on gender. For example, despite being vulnerable, gay men indicated they would be confident in protecting …show more content…
The three approaches she uses to try and understand sexual assault are to look it on the individual level, the organizational level, and the interactional level. On the individual level, sexual assault on college campuses are a result of “perpetrator or victim characteristics such as gender role attitudes, personality, family background, or sexual history” (Armstrong; 484). For example, men who commit sexual assault are likely to feel hostility toward women, use verbal pressure as a way to obtain sex, and have multiple consensual sexual partners. In contrast, victims of sexual assault tend to have characteristics of college women. However, there are women that are more vulnerable to sexual assault because of their characteristics. These women tend to be white, are prior victims of sexual assault, are first-years in college, or are more sexually active than their non-victim counterparts are. The second level she uses is the organizational level. This level looks at “rape culture”, which developed during the second wave of feminism. The rape culture approach analyzes sexual assault “as a consequence of widespread belief in ‘rape myths,’ or ideas about the nature of men, women, sexuality, and consent that create an environment conducive to rape” (Armstrong; 485). For example, the victim blaming aspect of rape and the tendency to accept men disrespecting women because they

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