Ww2 Dbq Analysis

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After World War I, the United States became increasingly isolationist until World War II, when America was forced to become more involved in foreign affairs to support France and Britain against Germany and Japan. Originally, the devastating consequences of World War I including war costs, the failure of the Treaty of Versailles and League of Nations in the US, and the harsh treatment of Germany led to America’s isolationism and neutrality. After pulling out troops from Latin American nations, the US further isolated itself in attempts to avoid any type of war, hoping to evade it using both internal and external methods. However, as World War II began and the Allied countries were suffering, Franklin D Roosevelt played a large role in expanding …show more content…
The Neutrality Acts stated that when “Upon the outbreak or during the progress of war between, or among, two or more foreign states, the President shall proclaim such fact, and it shall thereafter be unlawful to export arms, ammunition, or implements of war from any place in the United States” (Doc C). This ushered complete neutrality, and was seen when Francisco Franco rose up in the Spanish Civil War. The US put up an embargo on the loyalist government who sided with the USSR and the fascist rebels aided by Hitler and Mussolini. The US did nothing to stop the Democratic defeat in Spain, although Congress passed a billion-dollar naval construction act very late in the process. Furthermore, the Quarantine speech for American neutrality and against fascist nations, by FDR, angered isolationists and FDR did not take any direct action from this statement. His statements included that “War is a contagion” and ”The epidemic of world lawlessness is spreading… the community approves and joins in a quarantine of the patients in order to protect the health of the community” (Doc D). Speaking out against war, Roosevelt wanted peace and to stay away from the “sick” nations that resulted to war, increasing the isolationism in America. The Japanese bomb and sink the American Panay, which should have put the US into war, and disrupt the anti-war attitude, …show more content…
From the good neighbor policies that Roosevelt portrayed at the Pan-American Conference, America had small bursts of foreign policy that influenced those who wanted to intervene in the war. Soon after the Pan-American Conference, Secretary of State Hull passed the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act, which started low-tariff policies to combat the Hawley-Smoot Tariff during Hoover’s administration. The rates were cut by half, but on the notion that foreign countries would also provide lower tariffs, paving a way for a better international trading system. However, for the sake of war, the Neutrality Act of 1939 allowed European nations to buy war material on a cash-and-carry basis, meaning Europeans must provide ships and pay for the arms in cash. Due to Britain and France’s control of the seas, Germany was disallowed from trading with the United States. Nevertheless, this “neutrality” act was the start of more American intervention in the war. After France fell, Roosevelt wanted the nation to build up armed forces, with Congress passing the first peacetime draft in 1940, and 1.2 million troops being drafted. Even further in foreign affairs, the US made appearance at the Havana Conference, warning Germany that they could not take over

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