Family Genogram Paper: My Thesis Of Family Counseling

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Billy is a 17-year-old Native American who has lived with his parents and grandparents in a rented house. He is a high school senior who receives poor grades on core subjects and cuts school frequently with his friends. Billy’s family is of low socioeconomic status and both his parents work to support the family. Billy’s parents have been fighting against each other verbally and physically at night for many years. Recently Billy’s father lost his job and he beat Billy and his mother harshly. Billy felt depressed since his brother committed suicide two years ago. He began to use alcohol occasionally and now he drinks daily. Billy’s uncle and aunt who live in the same neighborhood worried about Billy and so they brought him to my counseling agency. …show more content…
My second-half of the first session is a family interview. When Billy, his parents, grandparents, uncle and aunt gather together, I greet them and help each of them to feel comfortable to stay together. Then, I invite each family member to define alcoholism. Later, I encourage them to discussion about alcoholism together while I watch and listen. Meanwhile, I reflect their feelings and contents to inform them that I track on their sharing. By watching and listening to the way they interact, I draft a family genogram to conceptualize the status of their family relationships. Afterward, I ask them what changes they want from the family counseling. At the end of the first session, I give out directives that I expect them to change from their discussion. For example, I urge Billy’s father to stop fighting against Billy’s mother and beating Billy. This first-order change may not affect the whole family system, but it eliminates Billy’s distress of involving in their marital …show more content…
The goal is to let Billy be aware of his potentials and improve his relationships. By using the technique of telling the story, Billy is encouraged to share his experience and express his feelings and thoughts. As he shares, he would understand the meaning of life. Also, existential approach has been shown to treat alcoholism effectively. Moreover, his relationship with parents would be transformed through counseling by allowing him to live more authentically. Family counseling has been supported to treat the family as a unit where one change of the subsystems would affect one another. Billy’s alcoholism is viewed as a family problem and it is treated by using family interventions. By changing the family communication, domestic violence would reduce and the family self-esteem would increase. Eventually, Billy’s positive moods would recover and he will not use alcohol to escape the sorrow of his family

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