Examples Of Totalitarianism In George Orwell's '1984'

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Any government has the potential to act as a corrupt force, to take away the rights of the people to remain in total control; no one understands that more than Winston, the protagonist in 1984. George Orwell is a respected dystopian author, and considering what Winston has to face it’s understandable. Everything is under regulation in Oceania, even citizens’ thoughts. The person willing to stand up against a totalitarian government has to be brave. They not only challenge the morality of the world around them, but reveal the conflict that arises when the oppressed attempt to overthrow their oppressors.
Morality is relative to an extent. Around the world there are generally accepted rules that everyone has to morally abide by, but within Oceania those rules don’t exist. What people would normally learn from their parents is taught by the government. What would be considered immorale is a normal part of everyday life. In a sea of a million brainwashed citizens, it should be impossible for anyone to form their own opinions like Winston does. The characters used to contrast Winston in 1984 implies it is the responsibility of the individual to know the truth and challenge others.
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This passage is a description of Winston’s fellow employee, Mr. Parsons, who is condemned for blindly following Big Brother and acting without questioning his orders. His character acts as a foil for Winston, and it is through his moral inferiority that the superiority of the individual revolutionary (in this case, Winston) is highlighted and made obvious. 1984 condemns the corrupted government and the bystander that follows along without question.

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