Genus Homo Evolution

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Since the emergence of the genus Homo, the hominins went through great patterns of evolution over generations. Through series of adaptations, the genus Homo spread in various geographic locations and eventually emerged as anatomically modern humans. With the allele frequency changes that evolved in the genus Homo, there is key evidence that microevolution led to macroevolution. From speciation to extinction, the modern synthesis helps us explain not only the mechanisms of evolution and the reproductive barriers between species, but also the various social adaptations that changed the hominins over time. From 2mya to ca. 0.2 mya, there is evidence for evolutionary derived adaptations that the genus Homo gradually evolved over generations. Microevolutionary …show more content…
SNPs are nucleotides that bond with complementary pairs. Due to microevolutionary forces such as gene flow and the founder effect, the alleles increase over time. The founder effect measures the percentage of alleles in small populations. Based on observing the skulls, Neanderthals have similar features to the Homo heidelbergensis. For example, the Neanderthal populations emerged based on the unique sequence of SNPs. There are multiple mutations, which creates new alleles at particular locus and it increases percentage of alleles in their district populations, giving the expansion of anatomically modern humans. For instance, African Neandertals and populations of the Denisovans evolved unique SNPs. These SNPs are significant because it eventually combines when the descendants of African anatomically modern humans spread into locations such as …show more content…
These reasoning are from particular adaptations that explain the emergence and spread of anatomically modern humans. For a Homo erectus, huge jaws and teeth are some of the common features that were shared with the Homo habilis. Also, their pentagonal shape of the face allows the species to have relatively larger brains. This is due to bigger cranial vault capacities and modes of speciation evolving over generations, which leads to the emergence of hominins. Thus, larger brains were significant adaptations that define the origins of anatomically modern humans. The development of bigger capacity of cranial vaults allowed complex thinking for species. This demonstrates the genus Homo evolving various anatomical features that benefited their style of living in a specific environment. Even after Homo erectus, brain sizes of species such as Homo heidelbergensis increased. Although species’ cranial robusticity decreased over time, the brain size constantly increased, which greatly expanded the omnivorous niche and complex technologies. The evidence for adaptations in the genus Homo in brain sizes hypothesize that extensive human brains support a stronger fit to the terrestrial and omnivorous

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