The Great Migration In The 1600's

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Between 1620 and 1645, the “great migration” occurred. It was known to be the largest migration for the English with over 45,000 people coming over to the 13 colonies (Alchin, n.d.-b). By the end of the 1600’s there was a rough estimate of 200,000 settled into the colonies. The northeastern part of the new world was the most populated (Springston, 2013). However, that number did not include the other two migrated groups: the Spanish and French. These two groups were on a growth spree, but not one that was as quick as the English. Going into the 1700’s the New World (America) continued to expand in high numbers. The English slowed down for the first couple of decades of the 1700’s due to wars back home and in the colonies (Alchin, n.d.-a). …show more content…
The majority of the U.S throughout the 1800’s was European decent but most were becoming U.S citizens as well. “In 1890, President Benjamin Harrison designated Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor near the Statue of Liberty, as a federal immigration station” ("U.S. Immigration,” 2009). This was the first time the federal government stepped in and started to control the immigration entry for the northern states ("U.S. Immigration,” 2009). The flooding of the northeastern region had become a problem and many started to move west of the Appalachian Mountains. “During the mid-1800s, a significant number of Asian immigrants settled in the United States. Lured by news of the California gold rush, some 25,000 Chinese had migrated there by the early 1850s” ("U.S. Immigration,” 2009). All of the Chinese immigration was put to an end due to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This act was the first to put a regulation on immigration. For the next 20 years the west coast had the biggest decline for Chinese immigration (History.com Staff, 2009). The second wave of immigration became the birth of the start of federal policies on immigration. By the end of the 19th century, over 10 million immigrants were welcomed into the United States, bringing the total population to over 70 million people (“The 1800,” …show more content…
It was not until after World War II that the number of European immigrants was on a decline and the southwestern states sought a growing number of immigrants ("U.S. Immigration,” 2009). The northeastern states were made up of 75 percent of foreign people and about one fourth of American citizens (Alchin, n.d.-a). Due to World War I, the Great Depression and then World War II, the United States saw a large number of Europeans becoming U.S citizens due to uprising immigration laws and reforms. During this time, the first “official” wave of Mexican immigration to the U.S started to oversee the southwestern states, from Texas to California. Between the 1930’s and the 1960’s the second wave of Mexican immigration occurred (Zong & Batalova, 2014). “The Bracero Program allowed for the importation of Mexican labor to help fill agricultural, and later, railroad labor vacancies left open by the war ” (Jaggers, J., Gabbard, & Jaggers, S. J., 2014, p. 7). After the Bracero program was shut down, the third wave was offered with seasonal work that took place in fields throughout America. A majority of those fields were in California and few in the northern states such as Illinois (Zong & Batalova, 2014). As the rise of the Latin immigration continued, the rise of the Chinese immigration also began. During the 1980’s and foregoing, the second wave of Chinese immigration made their way and

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