Ethos Pathos In Letter From Birmingham Jail

Improved Essays
Amjad Badrah
History 12 Letter from a Birmingham Jail

When the Civil Right revolution reaches its maximum height in 1963, Br. King was leading protests in Birmingham. When the court ordered to stop the demonstrations, Dr. King who supported the law throughout his life, found it essential to break the unjust law for the very first time. As a result, he was arrested and held for not in contact for a day. When incommunicado time passed, he was permitted to contact and received a copy of a letter written by eight local clergymen from Birmingham Post-Herald. In that open letter, clergymen called the protest “unwise and untimely” that Dr. King opposed in his letter. Though the name of the king was not directly mentioned in the letter, he thought to reply to it. He used the approach of ethos, pathos, and logos to address his concerns.

To solve the biggest issue Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” addressing to “Clergyman.” The letter emphasis on discussing the discrimination that was happing in the Birmingham. In his letter, Martin Luther King, Jr. uses ethical appeals, logical appeals and appeals to emotion to represent his aspiration for racial equality and justice. The letter was written to various clergymen who previously written an open letter to disapprove the actions of SCLC (Southern Christian
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Martin Luther King, Jr. states that although he is not from Birmingham, he wants to stay there because of the discrimination and injustice that white people do with black people. If he helps the people of Birmingham, that means he is helping the people from everywhere as stated with: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” (Luther, 1963). He thoroughly explains the reason for involving in the non-violent protest. The thesis statement provides a substantial reason for the lack of people’s wish to achieve equal

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