Ethical Ethics Of Euthanasia

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Terminally ill patients suffer agonizing pain. They are denied the right to die, and although euthanasia is controversial and considered unethical, instead of physicians denying them the right to die they should seek alternatives to alleviate thier patients suffering. Often times conflicts arise between physicians, patients and family members about what constitutes appropriate care for terminally ill patients. Issues around euthanasia consist of what is morally acceptable; the right thing to do. Is it unethical to choose euthansiana as a means to end one’s life due to suffering? Although some may disagree, terminally ill patients should be able to choose an earlier and less painful death, as there is no purpose in keepig them live to suffer needlessly. When evaluating euthanasia as a means to end a terminally ill patient’s life, utilitarianism assumes that it is possible to compare the intrinsic values produced by two different actions and evaluates which would …show more content…
First, it implies we should always act in order to maximize happiness for all, therefore, suggesting that everyones happiness counts equally. Second, the utilitarian theory weakness is that it is demanding, suggesting that happiness can not be the sole aspiration of human life because it is merely unattainable. The third weakness in utilitarism is that it is more concerned with increasing the amount of general happiness, rather than increasing any one person 's happiness. Some of these objections stem from religious beliefs. From this point of view, life is a precious gift from God and to end it prematurely would demonstate rejection of that gift as God should determine the time of death. Lastly, the consequences of legalization could inspire a castastrophic lack of respect for life, where physicians and family members may feel pressure to end the life of a patient that may be treatable with medication (Mosser,

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