Women In Terrorism

Great Essays
The involvement of women in domestic terrorism and warfare in the United States has been poorly explored by counterterrorist actors, scholars, and policy makers. This is because the experiences of females in armed conflict are different to those of men, due to the perceived gendered share of responsibilities and roles. Historically, direct combat was exclusively recognized as the affairs of men, with many children and women being the victims due to direct targeting and displacement. Thus, women have been frequently classified as victims of torture, gender-based violence, murder, and forced disappearance (LaFree & Ackerman, 2009). However, in the modern warfare, women have been not only victims of violence but also perpetrators of terrorism. …show more content…
It will thus determine if the United States counterterrorism policies should consider addressing women. The research findings will have a positive impact on the U.S. ability to combat future domestic terrorism. In order to understand effectively about female participation in domestic terrorism, this research utilizes data from the American Terrorism Study (ATS), which combines all terrorism investigations steered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) between 1990 and …show more content…
This definition remains consistent with most academic classifications of terrorism. The study also includes violent and ideologically charged female extremists because they employ violence and criminal tactics to further a political objective. Specifically, the study categorizes homegrown, U.S. women terrorists and excludes those simply affiliated to ideological groups or social movements that have never committed any crime. The analysis of this study focuses on females indicted in the U.S. for extremist arsons, homicides, and bombings.
Section II: Literature Review
The purpose of this research is to understanding the dynamics of women engagement in homegrown terrorism, and to determine if the U.S. counterterrorism approach should include women in addressing domestic terrorism. Thus, this section specifically reviews various theories that explains patterns of women’s involvement in terrorism. It furthers the scope of discussion to include theoretical models that explain women’s involvement in terrorism. Finally, the section unveils the various ideologies behind women’s engagement in terrorist acts.
Patterns of Women’s Involvement in

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