Essay On Importance Of Biology

2013 Words 9 Pages
What comes to mind when someone asks “What is biology”? Do you think of tiny cells spread throughout your entire body helping you stay alive, your DNA, or maybe plants? Biology is simply the study of living organisms. We learn by studying where living organisms come, from, where it has been, who or what were its ancestors, what it has used as food and even if there are any diseases or degenerations present. Biology helps us treat diseases, create vaccines, aid in better nutrition and has even helped us find where we as humans started from. There are endless amounts of significant discoveries that were found from the study of biology and everyday Scientists are discovering even more. When it comes to the discoveries of biology what are some …show more content…
Genetic diseases and disorders such as diabetes, cancer, and heart conditions account for seven out of ten deaths in the United States. These common diseases are also known as genetic diseases due to the fact that they run in a family medical histories. One challenge presented in predicting genetic diseases is that the number of genes that contribute to a disease are unknown. Another unknown factor is the number of genes brought on by children or their parents that can escalate risk. The risk of disease is calculated by past family medical history, environmental factors and data from families affected by disease. Cancer is a prime example of predicting genetic defects. Cancer is a series of mutations produced by cellular changes. There are some cancers caused by a genetic defect in one cell that runs in a family such as breast-cancer genes BRAC1 and BRAC2. Finding these defects aided scientists in locating these sets of genes in women whose family carries one or both …show more content…
The scientific errors that can occur in DNA profiling is minimal and the sequence used to determine the individual is very concise. Because of this DNA has been used as evidence to help capture perpetrators and even clear innocent people of the crimes committed. Most people share similar DNA sequences, but some areas of DNA are specific to each person. The areas in which are specific to each person are the location that forensics localize in when catching a perpetrator. For instance, the FBI’s forensic DNA identification system studies thirteen regions in the genome. Classifications in these specific regions suggest multiple recurrences of a short combination of letters such as GATA. By detecting the combination differences of the repetitious letters in both copies of DNA we are able to determine the DNA of one specific person with little to no errors. It takes all 13 sites sequences to correctly match DNA to a specific person, but only one sequence to clear a suspect. A sample is taken by cheek swab, then sent to one of more than two hundred different public and private labs used by the federal bureau of investigation where the swab of the suspects DNA will be analyzed. When two samples of DNA are compared and match in a large amount of numbers such as the thirteen in the FBI’s CODIS or combined DNA index system the possibility that someone other than the person supplying the DNA

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