Environmental Factors In The Origin Of Species By Charles Darwin

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During the early 1800’s much speculation occurred within the scientific community as to how life came to be, at this time scientists such as Andrew Knight, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and Charles Darwin all had their own ideas concerning the diversity of life on earth. A few theories were based upon the thought that variation had been attributed to the amount of food that had been available to an organism; this is what Andrew Knight had originally thought. Jean-Baptiste Lamarck had a different idea that environmental factors are the best explanation for the development of species, which as we’ll find is partially correct. Charles Darwin, the author of The Origin of Species did not fully refute these theories, especially Lamarck’s, as they were …show more content…
He wonders why distinct separate species exist rather than a single species with several variations present. Darwin attempts to explain this by discusses extinction and how it is mandatory for natural selection to occur; he states that for one species to be successful its previous form must become extinct. This allows for the species to continuously grow and develop modifications to existing structures. This process results in the fit individuals with the best traits surviving and reproducing, and the ones with less fit traits dying off, leaving only the best of the species. However, since the intermediate species die off it becomes extremely difficult to distinguish a clear line of organ modification, as the intermediate species become extinct. This results in gaps from ancestral and modern day organisms. The example he uses to best explain this is they eye. As the eye is a largely complex organ, he states that early ancestors may have had a primitive version of this organ, and over time it has developed with improvements allowing individuals with the enhanced structure of the eye to survive. He compares this to the telescope, as the early forms of the telescope were primitive and over time as technology had advanced so did the telescope. With that being said, Darwin goes on to discuss how it is difficult to determine how new structures arise from previous individuals to the current …show more content…
During his time however, it was found to be extremely controversial as Christianity had a vast amount of influence over the scientific community. Even though Darwin had received a great portion of criticism over his work, it still proved to be clearly written even today. The processes he used to explain his theory were methodical and relied purely on the scientific process of explaining observations, as thoughts alone would be impossible to explain variation within organisms. The experiments he had conducted with the birds of the Galapagos in addition to his observations of domesticated animals were found to explain his theory quite well, even though there were some areas to which he could not explain fully. Darwins theory of evolution provided the ground work for an entire new area of biology, modern day

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