Impact Of Slavery On African Society

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Throughout the years 600 CE to 1750 CE, there have been many countries that participated in slavery and slave trade. However, there is one linking factor to all of them: African society. Native African peoples were the subject to many slave raids and many of them were taken away as slaves (Stilwell 22). This heavily affected their society as well as their political situation, culture, and economy. To begin, slavery was an extremely harmful force to basic African society. Slave raids in Africa would often target mostly men, due to the perception of them being stronger workers. This caused a huge issue in the gender balance in Africa. Women would outnumber men greatly which resulted in a disbalance of the types of skill sets in African society …show more content…
As aforementioned, slave trade caused for a changed perception of guns and violence. Many Africans evolved to believe that killing other Africans or enslaving them was the right thing to do, at least to make money that is (M’bokolo 151). Due to the constant influx of Europeans, some European culture spread to Africa. It introduced new ideas to African society, such as Christianity (“Impact of Slave Trade”). Slavery also created a poorer image of African society. European slave traders would spread the idea that Africans were barbaric and less developed than Europeans. This led to most of the world to perceive Africans as inferior (“Impact on Africa”). All in all, slavery mostly worsened African society as it promoted violence and created a bad image of …show more content…
There were some negative factors that definitely damaged the economy, however. As previously mentioned, Africans would often lack skilled workers, which meant that they could not produce as quality or as many goods as if they had them (Getz 50). Slave raids also heavily damaged agricultural functions. Due to the fact that slave raids caused communities of people to move from place to place, farms were often abandoned, and therefore abandoning their “means of producing food and any economic stability they had” (“Impact on Africa”). Also, Africans had to spend more resources on building military defenses. In order to prevent slave raids from destroying a community, some groups invested into building defensive moats and having defensive weapons.This drained part of their economy though, as these measures were often expensive (“Impact of Slave Trade”). That being said, it can be argued that slave trade provided some economic benefit to African society. In many situations, Africans would receive goods that required in return for slaves (“Impact on Africa”). As well as helping their economy, it also introduced new technologies to them, such as muskets (M’bokolo 152-3). Most likely, the damaging effects outweighed the benefits, making slave trade negatively affect the African

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