Negative Effects Of South African Colonization

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The first time South Africa was colonized was in 1652 by the Dutch for its many raw materials and precious metals like gold; this colony was first fully established by the Dutch-East-India trading company. Over time the Dutch empire weakened and fell leaving the precious country open for the taking, and the English took advantage of this opportunity. In 1899, the English first colonized the South African ports and gold mines; this was a very important colony at the time since many of the Africans at the time were not against colonization. The southern tip South Africa, around Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, were also primary destinations for ships to stop between Europe and India; this gave Europe control of trade with India, another English colony. However, Colonialism was …show more content…
Over time the Dutch began to settle in the up-and-coming nation and colonize it. When the colonizing countries colonized South Africa they built a bit stronger and more centralized economy; this is the first of the good effects the parent countries caused. The Dutch for a long time, used the South African trade routes, and the colonization of the country put South Africa as a valid trading port on the map of many more European countries. Both of these positive effects of colonization are most simply summed up by the “vent-for-surplus theory (Zeleza).” This theory used in economics simply states: more trade causes an increase in economy and trade over the long term (Zeleza). Later, during English rule, the English economy began to costs businesses extra money through taxes and worker strikes. This caused many larger businesses to move some production and industry to South Africa increasing economy and trade even more (Afolayan 162). With the increase in trade and economical strengths, nicer buildings, smooth landscape, and beautiful beaches began

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