How Did King Edward The Confessor

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Did Edward the confessor make William the conqueror his heir before his death
England has been characterised by not having principles that were clearly established to guide matters related with royal succession. In the Anglo-Saxon era, lack of these principles often made succession matters ambiguous and often bloody, considering that England was enjoying military might, harboured expansionist ambitions and was under constant threat from neighbouring kingdoms such as Normandy. Heirs played a pertinent and pivotal role in ensuring that the royal bloodline of the monarchs was preserved, yet intermarriages and childlessness often complicated the smooth transition of power once a king passed on. However, lack in succession guidelines often fomented rivalry for the throne among the male children in the extended royal family. Usually, a king displayed preference for his preferred successor by allowing eligible male relatives, sons included, to participate in royal charters and gain titles to significant pieces of land in the English kingdom.
Notably, King Edward the confessor remained childless throughout his reign despite being married to Edith, a daughter of one of the three earls who remained in England while the kingdom was under Danish rule. As such, by the time of his death in 1066, King Edward has not sired an heir and as such, his vacant throne become contestable and even invited controversy and conflict as well. Indeed, the throne
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This brings in another tradition that is not necessarily related to the succession to the throne but rather the importance of religion to the politics and life of the English the time. Indeed, one account suggests that the childlessness of King Edward was a deliberate choice aimed at exhibiting his piety and spirituality amongst the

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