Essay On Isolationism

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Isolationism, intended to result in the best interests of a nation, is an ineffective foreign policy that represents weakness, selfishness, and fear. Remaining uninvolved in European conflict promotes that the United States is naive in believing that the rages of war will stay confined to the boundaries of Europe and Asia. Furthermore, one could claim that the country has no intention of maintaining peace overseas. Restrictions, such as The Neutrality Act of 1935, allow Hitler’s forces to grow stronger and for communism to spread throughout the east. Foolishly, isolationists assume that both physical and political distance will keep the United States safe from Nazi Germany influence; this assumption, if left unchanged, will lead to the downfall …show more content…
When congress passed the Neutrality acts, Hitler’s forces benefited due to the fact that his enemies no longer has access to american made weapons. Political cartoons, such as “Ho hum! No chance of contagion,” exploited isolationist ideals as being naive, senseless, and even childish. Although the dangers of war seem far away geographically, technology provides German military with the ability to travel overseas, making distance an irrelevant factor. Not only does isolationism affect nations in the heart of war, but it also influences average american citizens by preventing possible job opportunities and impacting the economy by altering foreign trade. Isolationism is a policy for the weak, and displays no intention of standing up against the rebelling Nazi empire; by refusing to be involved in the European conflicts taking place, the United States is exhibiting a fearful, vulnerable, ungenerous country that is incapable of defending itself, and unable to assist its allies in their time of desperate

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