Martin Luther King Influence

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remain as one of the most prominent figures of United States history for addressing issues of social justice plaguing our society on a national scale. Dr. King’s impact in the Civil Rights Movement reappears each year on Martin Luther King Jr. Day and during Black History month. American culture remembers Dr. King solely for few significant moments in his life, such as his “I have a dream speech” and March on Washington. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is viewed from a one-dimensional way, as the ideal symbol of achieving equality in the nation, but in reality he has a different image that society doesn’t publicize which hinders the social progress of the black community. Yes, Dr. King is pro-Christian, anti-racist, and …show more content…
King is well-known for his leadership in the church, establishing the credibility and power of the Christian faith to transform the ignorance and hatred of those that persecute the innocent. However, the public doesn’t know about Dr. King calling for reformation of the church. He wanted “ecclesial structures to embody the beloved community in spirit and example” (Baldwin 27). The Christian faith is not able to change the conditions of the black people, if the church itself still remains divided by race more than by “differences in denomination, gender, or sexual orientation” (Baldwin 27). King recognized the duality of the church as it was “both the body of Christ and the greatest bulwark of white supremacy” (Baldwin 28). It was evident to Dr. King of the church’s contradicting image, for example, neglecting the economic injustice of the nation. The church was not upholding the ideals of Christ, neglecting the poor and the weak. Dr. King called for the church to use “its own vast resources to help improve the quality of life for millions who are undernourished and ill-housed” (Baldwin 28). The church preaches the ideals of Christ, loving one another as equals, but practices another, ignoring those that are different in color and social class. Dr. King believed in the Christian faith, but he believed the church was not doing what Christ would have wanted. Some people should not be living in inordinate wealth, while others are living in abject poverty. Nevertheless, Dr. King blames the church for “the confusion, the hesitation, the bitterness and violence that threatened the survival of humankind” (Baldwin 30). Henceforth, Dr. King challenged the church to change its structure and create a moral balance enabling all men and women to live together in peace and harmony. The power of Christianity will only transform the lives of those struggling if there is no distinction between a black church or white church, but there is a church universal that “fosters mutual

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