F. D. Roosevelt: Modern Liberalism

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When people say the term liberal many think moderate but leaning leftward, but classical liberalism is a tradition within liberalism that seeks to maximize the realm of unconstrained individual action typically by establishing a minimal state and reliance on market economy. Such as Adam Smith and Milton Friedman saw the best way to run the country. These two have the same views as humans being rationally self-interested creatures, with a pronounced capacity for self-reliance. Capitalism within classical liberalism is the idea of having a country based around the idea of a capitalist society, where the economics and political system of a county’s trade and industry are controlled by private owners for profit, rather than by the state . Adam …show more content…
D. Roosevelt he was a modern liberal. A modern liberal is a combined theory of new and old liberalism with ideological and theoretical tensions, most notable would be the role of the state and its powers. FDR was the president during the great depression so he had a rough road ahead of himself. Although Roosevelt disagreed with the idea of capitalism during the great depression he believed that saving the capitalist system was the only path to recovery. However Roosevelt did disagree with the free market people, he believed that there needed to be more intervention on the state level. Roosevelt was a man who believed that the government could make reasonable decisions because he was the one who said “reason over passion”, by this I believe that he means that he thinks that the government can make decisions for the public whereas from a capitalistic point of view they think the economy should run itself without the help of the government. Roosevelt thinks that the government can make the biggest impact on the economy. Roosevelt during the Great Depression provided jobs to the country by making jobs by building bridges, dams, highways, and schools, this is an act of reason over passion because Roosevelt uses reason to create jobs for the people of

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