Cultural Anthropology: The Study Of Human Cultures In Anthropology

1499 Words 6 Pages
There are many subfields in Anthropology. One of them is cultural anthropology, which is the study of individual cultures mostly through participant observation, living in a culture or learning a culture different from your own. Cultural anthropology seeks to learn and compare cultures to help us as humans understand each other and recognize our diversity (Cloak, Jr., F. T., 1968). Basically, one cannot fully understand a culture without looking at all the features (the whole picture). One of the basic importances of cultural anthropology has been the comparability of all human cultures. Although anthropologists have observed that each human culture is unique and represents a whole way of life for the people within, since World War II there …show more content…
Without language, it is simple to say that culture and society could not exist. Language is what defines morals and rights and wrongs. Language is the one thing that distinguishes us from other species and from each other. (Reed, Carroll E., 1952). It examines how human languages work, how they are made, how they change, and how they die and are later revived (Reed, Carroll E., 1952). Linguistic anthropologists try to understand language in relation to the broader cultural, historical, or biological contexts that make it possible. Linguistic features of communication also include any verbal contact, as well as nonlinguistic features, which would include movements, eye contact, the cultural context, and even the recent thoughts of the speaker (Duranti, Alessandro, 2009). It is clear that the language differences are symbolic and that political problems arise from differences in cultural expectations associated with language usage. This difference between expectation and the miscommunication which results from it is seen to be related to the economic and social concerns of the individuals involved (Gumperz, John J., 1974). A problem that is encounter is the issue of urban education in industrialized society. Since the late 1950s, it has become increasingly obvious that urban educational systems are failing in their task of …show more content…
Archaeologists study the past; they look at the remains of people and their civilization. In general, archaeologists recover material culture, such as buildings, tools, and other artifacts that are the residue of former societies through site excavation (Schuyler, Robert L., 1988). Archaeologists are interested in the organization of past societies, the manner in which people once made and used tools such as technology, how people thought about the world and each other, the nature of pre-modern environments, and the processes that affect the formation of sites (Skibo, James M., Michael W. Graves, and Miriam T. Stark, 2007). Archaeology offers a unique perspective on human history and culture that has contributed greatly to our understanding of both, the ancient and the recent past. Archaeology helps us understand, not only when and where people lived on earth, but also why and how they have lived. This examines the changes and causes of changes that have occurred in human cultures over time. It also seeks patterns and explanations of patterns to explain everything from how and when people first came to inhabit the Americas (Schuyler, Robert L., 1988). Unlike history, which relies primarily upon written records and documents to interpret great lives and events, archaeology allows us to investigate far back into the time before written languages existed and to glimpse the lives of

Related Documents