Crime Scene Profiling Case Study

794 Words 4 Pages
Summary: Chapter 2 - Crime scene profiling was developed in the US by BSU of the FBI in the early 1970’s. Crime scene profiling observes details dealing with behavioral science and demographic characteristics. Profiling is something that most people naturally do but the crime scene profiling was created to help law enforcement view the psychological point of a study. In 1984 the NCAVC, BAU, and ViCap was created. All organizations were created to assist law enforcement investigate cases, such as homicides, serial rape terrorism, gangs, and conflict and crisis management. Also, CARD and CARTs was created to investigate child abductions. This chapter also discusses deductive analysis which is determined by things we already know about the suspect …show more content…
Hazelwood and Douglas articles introduce organized nonsocial offender, and disorganized asocial offender. Organized nonsocial offender someone who lives with someone and they would commit crimes far from home. This offender is also highly educated and enjoys watching the news to follow crimes. Disorganized a social offender is someone who wasn’t known for having long last relationships, this individual would commit crimes closer to their home. Crime scene profiling is done in three stages: law enforcement collects crime scene data, evidence is presented to the profiler department, lastly the profile report in given to the police investigating the file. Case linkage is a significates tool for profiling, it is identifying crimes that are seem like a pattern and may have been committed by the same offender. Profilers can determine if the crime has been a repeat because they may use the database to search for similar characteristic within the victim or search the database to find similarities within the criminal to see if they are someone that has already been identified. The job of profilers is to narrow down the list of potential l suspect could be or identify the kind of person that could have committed the …show more content…
Chapter 3 shows why these assumptions are not correct. Profilers provide information that may not be useful to the investigation. Philosopher Charles Peirce provides a couple of methods profilers may follow while observing the evidence. Method of tenacity is where people use their beliefs about human behavior to always be correct because that’s all that they have seen or have knowledge of, which is their gut feeling. Method of authority is where people don’t question a statement because that is what they read, seen online or heard from someone who they think is more educated then their self. The method of science is to test statements through systematic examination and/or study. David Canter’s method involves answering 4 questions that are already “core issues” in other areas of psychology. Another way of identifying a suspect is to look for psychological signatures, which could be walking patterns or a certain why they may leave the victim. The chapter continues to mention theories such as development and maturational theories about interpersonal skills. Potential errors problems could accrue in scientific profilling. Heuristics (mental shortcuts for dealing with information) can be a common

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