Similarities Between The Federalists Pros And Cons

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I chose to focus my posting on “The Federalist/ Anti-Federalist Controversy.” The controversy started after the delegates drafted the new federal Constitution. They had to draft and make a new constitution because the Articles of Confederation were weak and falling apart. The Articles of Confederation was the form of government the United States was under. When the new Constitution came out, they sent it out to the states for approval. In order for the Constitution to enact or become the new government, nine of the thirteen states had to ratify it. There were two groups that emerged when the new Constitution went to the states, the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. The group that opposed and did not support the Constitution were the Anti-Federalists. …show more content…
The Federalists supported the ideas of the Constitution because they favored and wanted a strong central, federal government. Alexander Hamilton led the Federalists. Alexander tried to convince the citizens of New York to ratify the Constitution because they would miss out on being part of the new United States. Hamilton started to write a series of articles that would become published in the New York newspapers. The purpose behind writing these articles in the New York newspapers was to advocate for ratifying the Constitution and to say why the states needed a strong central government. James Madison and John Jay joined the Federalists too. James Madison was the Father of the Constitution. The main purposes of the Federalist essays in the newspapers were to persuade New York to ratify the Constitution. However, the Federalist essays have now become the best evaluation of the U.S. Constitution. The essays explain the ideas of the Constitution and John Locke’s ideas like natural rights and the “social

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