Effects Of The Atomic Bomb On Japan

1189 Words 5 Pages
The year of 1945 brought shocking news to the people of the world as well as conflict between the two countries of Japan and the US. On August 6, 1945, towards the end of World War II, an American B-29 bomber dropped the world’s first atomic bomb over Hiroshima. The military was unaware of what the consequences would be for their actions. A soldier described the dropping of the atomic bomb as exciting at first when they saw the cloud circle, until they saw the after effects of what they have done. The scientific gamble of the Manhattan Project has cost the United States over 2 billion dollars, but they described the bombing of Japan as a “victory” despite the many casualties it caused to the people of Japan. After the dropping of the atomic …show more content…
Survivors of the atomic bomb complained about neurotic symptoms - which included general fatigue, amnesia, and lack of concentration. Some people would recall the occurrence of the atomic bomb, then become upset or feel extreme guilt or discouragement. The people of Japan also experienced post traumatic stress disorder and either had nightmares, flashbacks, anxiety, insomnia, anger and irritability. Others had trouble concentrating, depression, and suicidal thoughts. 90 percent of medical personnel were killed or disabled which made it harder to care for the injured in Japan. Exposure to radiation caused symptoms ranging from nausea, bleeding and loss of hair, flash burns, and death. Women who were pregnant may have given birth to babies with a small brain size, mental retardation, lower IQ, blindness, or delayed development. Women were also at risk of breast cancer. The atomic bomb clearly had deadly effects on the people of Japan and the U.S. is aware of this catastrophe and after knowing all of this, the development of the hydrogen bomb sounds …show more content…
The first objective was to bring the war with Japan to an end. The second objective was to demonstrate the weapon of mass destruction to the Soviet Union. In August 1945, the relations between the Soviet Union and the U.S. had deteriorated badly due to the leaking of the secrets of the atomic bomb. Espionage was a big concern with the development of the atomic bombs. Despite the top security, soviet spies were still able to penetrate the project and steal information about the atomic bomb. The Manhattan project was not infiltrated by Germany or Japan, but by America’s ally – the Soviet Union. Ironically, the Soviet spies held positions of trust and importance in the Manhattan Project which easily allowed them to pass on valuable information about the bomb and its design to the Soviet Union. Theodore Hall was a young scientist on the Manhattan Project and he was one of the spies that passed along information to the Soviet Union about the development of the hydrogen bomb. The most famous espionage yet, would be the Rosenberg couple, Julius and Ethel who were executed on June 19, 1953 for espionage. They released the secret of the atomic bomb to the Soviet

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