Child Language Essay

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Analysing and comparing features of child language, using transcripts from a child with normal language and a child with a speech impairment

Introduction
Child language is not dominated by one particular theory but instead explained and explored through a variant of theories, all of which delve into different ideologies on language acquisition. In this essay, I will traverse over relevant theories that can help to better understand the differences of a child with normal language compared to a
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They are both allomorphs of the morpheme ‘a’. The SLI child repeatedly says ‘a elephant’ and ‘a egg’, using the incorrect form. The reason I believe this is an effect of SLI is because the child with normal language is able to use the correct allomorph when needed, for example he says ‘an easy one to make’. With the examples provided it clearly shows that there is a significant developmental difference between children with and without SLI.
According to Brown (1973) children go through five stages of syntactic development, the stage I will be referring to is the last stage, which concentrates on children from forty-two months onwards. This stage recommends that children should be using pronouns correctly in sentences and should also be able to use the third person irregular present tense, for example, ‘she
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According to Crystal (1976) the consonant phonemes /tʃ/ and /ʃ/ should be fluent within the child’s language by the time they are three and a half years old. The child with SLI produces the word ‘chair’ as /daoʊ/ replacing the /tʃ/ sound, he then goes on to say ‘sheep’ as /f:ʃ:ip/ this is palatal fronting, the theory would suggest that the child should no longer be producing these fronting features. However, the diagram (Grunwell, 1985) suggesting these chronological ages does not suggest how well these phonemes are

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