Compare And Contrast Fairy Tale In Jane Eyre

Improved Essays
I am certain that everyone can name numerous fairy tales. The most popular ones such as “Cinderella”, “Little Red Riding Hood”, and “Beauty and the Beast” are well known among the young and the elderly with a slight difference due to the various versions. The fairy tales that the elderly know are generally dark and disturbing while the most recent ones are happy and fantasy like. They attract more the little girls who want to be pretty princesses. In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë does not seem to hint towards intentionally comparing her novel to any version of a fairy tale that you have heard of before. However, it is quite easy to find elements of her novel those are similar to “Bluebeard” and “Cinderella”. Brontë shows that Jane Eyre is a fairy …show more content…
There are different versions to this fantasy story, but they all have the same idea of a poor daughter who loses both her parents and has to deal with her evil step mother and evil step sisters. She over comes obstacles to get to the ball that all the unmarried women are invited to and leaves the ball at midnight. Eventually, she ends up with the prince. There are obvious similarities such as the evil step mother, two evil step sisters, the “fairy godmother” or seen as the nicer version of a mother figure for Jane Eyre, according to Clarke. The evil step-mother being Mrs. Reed: “Then Mrs. Reed subjoined—“Take her away to the red-room, and lock her in there” (Brontë 640). Mrs Reed knew that Jane was terrified of the red-room because it was the same room where Mr. Reed had died. Jane felt like the room was haunted by his spirit. The two evil step sisters are Jane’s cousins Eliza and Georgiana Reed who “evidently acting according to orders, spoke to me as little as possible” (Brontë 651). Also similar to the fairy tale, Jane had followed suit in the “Cinderella” story by becoming a maid: “For Bessie now frequently employed me as a sort of under-nurserymaid, to tide the room, dust the chairs” (Brontë 653). With such similarities, it is clear that Brontë made Jane Eyre to be a different version of the traditional “Cinderella” fable possibly to show the …show more content…
It also shows her boldness to do things that she believes in. Her independence also tries to rise to the surface; however it is pushed down relatively fast. When Jane is sent to the red room, Mrs. Reed threatens “you will now stay here an hour longer and it is only on condition of perfect submission and stillness that I shall liberate you then” (Brontë 644). This shows that Mrs. Reed wants to ensure that Jane understands she has to listen. Unfortunately, Jane was put in to the red room on false pretenses; she was using self defense against her cousin John Reed who had started the scuffle. We see that John could never get into trouble because even after the worse act possible, he still continues to be Mrs. Reed’s “own darling” (Brontë 642).
In conclusion, a fairy tale gone wrong is shown throughout the novel of Jane Eyre. It is shown by comparing the notion of “Bluebeard” and “Beauty and the Beast” to the character and lifestyle of Mr. Rochester of Thornefield. Comparing “Cinderella” to Jane Eyre as the character also establishes a connection. The fairy tale gone wrong is shown through the way Jane Eyre develops from the normality of society through her rebelliousness. Fairy tales are everywhere, even when we mature and grow up. We see parts of all sorts of fables throughout literature. All in all, fairy

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Jane Eyre Deceit Analysis

    • 291 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Brontë utilizes the motif of deceit through dialogue to depict the corruption of authority. Jane Eyre establishes the motif of deceit by presenting Mrs. Reed’s façade towards the world, stating she is outwardly nice, but secretly cruel to Jane. By opening stating her deceit, Jane is calling out society’s acceptance of her “bad” and “hardhearted” personality, as they accept Mrs. Reed’s accusations of Jane. Later, Mr. Brocklehurst deceives the girls of his school by imposing a double standard from “every precept and principle” of his religion, restricting the students from having natural curly hair, but allowing his family to fashion themselves with the same curls, while remaining respectable. Brocklehurst’s dialogue demanding that his students…

    • 291 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The retelling of fairy tales has become a popular trend that allow us to view our beloved fairy tales in a new light. Cinderella has been reinvented multiple times throughout history, and can be found across multiple cultures. In the novel, Ella Enchanted, author Gail Carson Levine shows us a modern adaptation of the tale that reinforces from the original, but at the same time differs greatly. The protagonist Ella, shares similar events and qualities with Cinderella, but they also have contrasting experiences and personalities.…

    • 629 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre, her unexamined, culturally conditioned definitions of ‘success’ and ‘happiness’; shape the narrative through their contradicting definitions. According to Bronte, women have the same capacity for success and Independence as men. However, her subconscious cultural belief that a woman’s success is to be married is a contradiction of her first definition of success. This results in a struggle between these two beliefs in Jane Eyre. Furthermore, the culture expectations of women deeply embedded in Bronte’s novel create a parallel between the story lines of Cinderella and Jane Eyre.…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Who’s Jane Eyre? Jane is an orphan from England. Her parents died of typhus, a skin disease. Her uncle reed took her in. Sadly he died as well.…

    • 453 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Foils Throughout Jane Eyre In Charlotte Brontë’s novel, Jane Eyre, Brontë develops many different characters to serve as foils to the main character, Jane, to fully characterize her. Jane, as we know, does not come from a very well off background. Even though many do not see her as the typical girl—pretty, skinny, and well dressed, she is known for her intelligence, honesty, and plain features. Throughout the novel, Jane becomes increasingly good at making her opinions known on certain subjects she feels strongly about.…

    • 1256 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Adversity In Jane Eyre

    • 1643 Words
    • 7 Pages

    In Charlotte Bronte’s gothic fiction Jane Eyre, a young woman challenges authority, faces adversity which she overcomes, and is determined to marry not for others, but for love. Growing up with her Aunt and cousins, Jane learned quickly to gain a voice with which she could defend herself. Jane and Mrs. Reed’s relationship are described discourteously. Jane is aware of her Aunt’s feelings towards her, as she admits to knowing, “‘My uncle Reed is in heaven, and can see all you do and think; and so can papa and mama: they know how you shut me up all day long, and how you wish me dead’” (Bronte 18).…

    • 1643 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Bronte immediately establishes Jane Eyre as an outsider in society in the opening of Chapter 1, significantly through her pervasive use of foil. She sets the scene with “John, Eliza and Georgiana […] clustered round their mama in the drawing-room” with Jane looking in from the outside of such a close circle. A “cluster” connotes warmth, love and affection, which Jane is clearly not entitled to. The introduction from the very beginning of this whole series of characters used to alienate Jane is utilised by Bronte to emphasise the wrongness of the ostracism in society, even to a young, vulnerable child. Jane is again reminded of her inferiority to the central family unit when John Reed says to Jane: "You have no business to take our books [...]…

    • 729 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Literature is powerful and influences people of all ages, backgrounds and life experiences. As an audience, we are placed in these stories, thinking and feeling with the characters and experiencing as they do. The novel The Secret River by Kate Grenville, James McAuley’s poem Because, and the 2011 film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre, all present strong symbolism and imagery which exceed the test of time. Classic and canonical texts transcend time through the aesthetic qualities of symbolism and imagery, which capture audience attention while developing tension to create powerful and enduring messages. Kate Grenville's influential novel, The Secret River, published in 2005, is canonically recognised for its enduring messages…

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    An effective way that a novel becomes timeless is through the social change that the story may prompt. Once a book influences thought or action, its validity and relevance increases. During the Victorian Era in which Jane Eyre takes place, women were forced by society into becoming simplistic and conforming without rebellion. Instead of allowing individuality and expression, men tended to suppress the freedom and personalities of females. To this day still, the lack of female empowerment in a patriarchal society takes prevalence.…

    • 1483 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Jane Eyre Flaws

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte follows the life of the main protagonist Jane Eyre, a young, head-strong lady that is not afraid to speak her mind. Born into poverty and orphanage, Jane finds herself in a handful of locations throughout her life, starting with Gateshead, the home of her adopted mother, Mrs. Reed, who often issues peremptory commands in an attempt to slander Jane. Later, Jane is sent away to Lowood, an underfunded religious school for unfortunate girls, hired as a governess at Thornfield Hall, the mansion of Edward Fairfax Rochester, and finally, after running away from Thornfield because of unforeseen emotional conflict with Rochester, ends up at Moor House, the home of Diana, Mary, and St. John Rivers, cousins Jane…

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Edward Said declares exile to be a terrible, but also enriching, experience. Inherently, this seems paradoxical -- after all, how can something be both abhorrent and empowering? In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the titular character suffers this kind of isolation from society, and through her isolation develops both a deep desire for human companionship and a fierce independence, and is then forced to grapple with her two incompatible desires. In the beginning of the novel, it is immediately established that Jane Eyre is an orphan.…

    • 944 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 749 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Charlotte Bronte’s life experiences inspired her to create many of the characters and events that appear in her novel Jane Eyre, such as Jane’s friend Helen Burns, who was inspired by Bronte’s sister Marie. Like her novel counterpart, Marie died of consumption in an institution much like the Lowood School for orphan girls in the novel. Jane Eyre is the story of an orphan girl who had never known love. She lived with her atrocious aunt and cousins who wanted absolutely nothing to do with her, but her luck changed when she attended Lowood School. As Jane matures over the course of her stay she developed new ideologies and a need for something more, which led her down a path of love, newfound independence, and deadly secrets.…

    • 749 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Jane Eyre's Foster Family

    • 219 Words
    • 1 Pages

    Throughout the novel, Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, Jane’s experiences and the loving characters who she meets make her stronger. As Jane Eyre grows at Gateshead, she is constantly tested by her foster family and the situations she is placed in. Jane Eyre, an orphan, is hated, neglected, and beaten by her foster family. After John abuses Jane, she states “He bullied and punished me-- not two or three times in the week, nor once or twice in the day, but continually…” (14).…

    • 219 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There are many significant passages in the novel, Jane Eyre, reveals Jane as a person including her values that foretold her inheritance of money from her father and the love/support from Bessie, Miss Temple, and Mrs. Fairfax. In Jane Eyre, Jane seeks out for her family, for a sense of being, value, and belonging. Although, she is also having a tendency to need independence. At the beginning of the novel, she is an unloved orphan that does not receive any parental love from Mrs. Reed or love from her cousin, John Reed. John tortures her, reminding her the rules within the household.…

    • 501 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In many book to movie adaptation, characters and scenes are added or left out to meet with time constraints or to keep the movie interesting. The 2011 movie adaptation of Jane Eyre directed by Cary Fukunaga is no different, it attempts to stay true to the five-hundred-page book in just under two hours. However, the director lacks fidelity in his movie adaptation. While, the movie stays true to the basic storyline of the novel, many scenes in the movie destroy the integrity of the main character Jane Eyre, altering her from an independent, observant, intellectual character, to one who is weak, controlled, and ultimately the walking symbol of the patriarchy. There is one particular scene that has been added to the movie that best portrays the weakening of Jane Eyre.…

    • 1425 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays