Compare And Contrast Dubious And Booker T Washington

Superior Essays
An early Civil Rights Debate
In the late 19th century, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B Dubious were the most influential African Americans in America. They both were philosophers who wanted justice and equality for black people; however, they both had different methods and perspectives in how to tackle the racism that was going on during that time period. Although they had their differences it is undoubted that the dispute between both of them shaped the course of history for African Americans, which made America how it is today.
Booker T. Washington was born in Virginia on a farm in 1856. He was unfortunately born into slavery, but that did not stop him from getting an education. He went to school and attended the Hampton Normal and Agricultural
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Both men definitely wanted to strive for equality; even though they both had different things in mind, in the end, they wanted black people to have better lives. They were also both against lynching. Not to mention, they both also were strong black leaders that made a huge impact during their time period which led to the civil rights movement. Even to this day, black people are faced with racism and they look back to what Washington and Dubious philosophies were to try to overcome racism. Nevertheless, Washington’s views differed in how he wanted black people to do and act. Washington’s strategies were more of a long goal plan, he wanted African Americans to focus on doing hard work, such as farming and industrial work, “No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized ( 1.6). ” He was strict on that idea, hence why he said ostracized. If black people worked diligently, then white people eventually would start to accept and respect black people and if people began to discriminate them, Washington said to be silent and to continue doing their work, which was more important. However, Washington was for education, even though many people did not know that, including dubious. Washington would fund public schools. Washington basically wanted black people to work with the system. He also was opposed …show more content…
Dubious wanted black people to fight for their rights; he wanted them to protest for their freedom. I believe that because Dubious was not born into slavery like Washington, Dubious was used to be free, so that is why he was wanted to fight for freedom. Perhaps that is why Washington was reluctant of fighting to have freedom because he never did taste freedom like Dubious did from the start. Not to mention, Washington was influenced by Armstrong, the school founder of the Institute he went to. He took Armstrong’s words and started to mold ideas in his head that by working hard, the black folks would start to get respect. However, Dubious wholeheartedly disagreed with them both. His strategies were by protesting and starting civil rights organizations. Dubious wanted black people to have a voice; he wanted them to vote and to continue their education. He was a strong believer that having an education was a powerful thing and wanted children to have one. He also argues that the Talented Tenth should have top notch education and have the best opportunities and have leadership roles for the top talented ten percent of African

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