Chiang Kai-Shek Movement

Superior Essays
Although things were improving and changing under the control of Chiang Kai-shek the Communists party was not satisfied with their current position in society. Mao had failed with the previous attempted revolt in the Autumn Harvest Uprising he continued to work with the peasants and low working class in the rural Chinese provinces. However, Mao still believed in the power and force behind a peasant revolution and that they would “rise like a tornado or tempest—a force so extraordinarily swift and violent that no power, however great, will be able to suppress it.” (HW 91) His efforts was supported by the military command of Zhu De. They were able to gather and organize guerrilla forces from the rural peasants and “By the winter of 1927-28, the …show more content…
Mao had spent a great amount of time with the peasants and adopting their ways. This helped the peasants to sympathize his effort to create and control a Communists China. Their support helped Mao as he was able take the cities from the countryside. This eventually led to the defeat of Chiang Kai-shek.
However, his efforts took time and did not happen right away with the support of the peasants. The historical period known as the the Long March played an important role in the leadership and life of Mao and the Communists part. At first Mao and the army were successful with their continued use of guerrilla warfare against the cities from rural peasant
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After World War I the League of Nations was created to help improve international diplomacy between the various nations and to avoid violence and war. However, the League of Nations proved to be weak and unable to restrict the actions of Japan against the Chinese and the takeover of Manchuria. With no international check on Japan and China still weak and split between the Nationalist and Communist they continued to push south. Many Chinese were upset with the Japanese and their aggressive actions against their homelands. However, they were also dissatisfied with the Nationalist government as it seemed like nothing was being done to stop Japan for gaining control of China. The Nationalist government was still involved with the Communist Party and trying to stop its success and growth. The strategy of “internal unity before external danger” was adopted after the mutiny at Xi’an by the Nationalist troops that had been ousted by the Japanese from Manchuria. (NCL 21) Shortly after this the Chinese under the united Nationalist and Communist forces turned their attention to pushing Japan out. However, Japan was still making gains against the united forces of China. The parties still did not trust each other and this weakened their efforts against the Japanese. “The Communists expanded their influence wherever opportunities presented themselves through mass organizations,

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