The Stamp Act Analysis

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The acts passed by the British generated angry and motivated colonists. The British were not intentionally trying to infuriate the colonies; they had to find ways to get themselves out of war debts. But for every British action on the colonists, colonials had an overwhelming animosity toward their homeland. The reoccurring taxing prompted the colonies to rebel against Britain in attempt to become their own independent country. Striving to reduce the smuggling of Sugar into the colonies from Caribbean islands that were not affiliated with them, Britain passed the Sugar Act in 1764. The Sugar Act put a tax on all imported sugar and molasses from foreign countries except Britain. The act also raised the cost of coffee, indigo and outlawed the …show more content…
The Stamp Act required a stamp on all printed-paper goods in the US. This included items that were necessities to people such as licenses and legal documents, they even taxed newspapers and playing cards. This tax was imposed to provide money to the thousands of troops who were sent to defend the colonists’ frontier near The Appalachian Mountains. The cost of the stamp itself was a very little amount, but was seen as by the colonists as “The Big Bully Britain” stealing money from the small colonies. The Stamp Act started the “No taxation without representation!” ideology taken by the colonists. They decided that it was time to take action against Britain rather just moaning to their neighbors about how corrupt Britain is, so the Stamp Act Congress was established in 1765. The Congress had hopes of getting the act repealed and worked on organizing “Non-Importation” Agreements. These were boycotts by the colonies in response to the Stamp Act. This paved the way for colonists to blatantly defy British rule. In response to the colonists’ reaction of the Stamp Act, Britain repealed the act in 1766, along with passing the Declaratory Act, which said that Britain had the right to tax the colonies. Britain wanted to remind the colonies who the authoritarian was, that they were in charge of all that occurred in the colonies, including …show more content…
The Townshend Acts required a tax on imported goods received by the colonies. This included glass, lead, paint, paper, and what made everyone horrified, tea. Colonials felt that they were being taken advantage of and certainty let the King know. All the taxes from the Townshend Acts, excluding tea, were repealed in 1770. A protest against this took place in Massachusetts where boycotting protesters were harassing the British agents stationed in Boston. It turned from arguing, to throwing snowballs, to throwing rocks and than eventually turned into a brutal fight, which resulted in five colonists dead and what we know today as the Boston Massacre. Small groups known as Committees of Correspondence were created within each individual colony to be able to keep communication with all of the other colonies. Colony leaders wanted to make sure that other colonies were still against the parliament policies of Great

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