Heart Rate Experiment

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Abstract
The purpose of this exercise laboratory experiment was to, analyse and observe the role that exercise plays in affecting the blood pressure and heart rate of a patient, with and without the consumption of caffeine. In this experiment, a cycle ergometer (Monark 824E, Monark Exercise, Sweden) was used in an incremental style type exercise that measured the fourteen healthy participants blood pressure and heart rate at various interval stages. The blood pressure and heart rate were recorded in order to obtain an understanding of the impact this would have on the cardiovascular system. The experiment initially revealed that the participants who consumed caffeine before the experiment had a very slight differential increase in results compared
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Initially, the class broke up into groups of five with each member of the group having a role to play in the experiment. The first volunteer from the group performed the ergometer intensity exercise (Monark 824E, Monark Exercise, Sweden). The second group member was the timekeeper, who’s main objective was to alert the group of when to observe and record the participant’s blood pressure as well as add weight to the cradle of the ergometer (Monark 824E, Monark Exercise, Sweden). The third group member was responsible for monitoring and observing the participant’s blood pressure using the blood pressure monitor supplied (Omron, M3, Milton Keynes, UK). The fourth member of the group obtained the rate of perceived exertion from the participant using the Borg scale and also to observe the participant’s heart rate using the heart rate monitor provided (Polar Heart rate monitors, T31, Finland). The fifth and final member of the group recorded all the data obtained throughout the stages of the …show more content…
Whether the participants consumed caffeine or not, they all showed the same increased heart rate when obtained just after the exercise phase of the exercise. Once the recovery phase commenced, the heart rate started to find a steadying rate and maintained that level. This is important because it indicates that the heart obtained a consistency for an interval of time and maintained the substantial level (MacMasters et al, 1987). As the recovery phase continued, the heart rate in all participants decreased incrementally until it met the resting rate. This is due to the activation of the parasympathetic system and the decrease in oxygen demand lowering the function (MacMasters et al,

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