Black Death Dbq

Improved Essays
Around the year of 1346, a disease known as The Black Death, started in China and rapidly spread throughout Europe. The disease wiped out the populations of Christians and Muslims in percentages ranging from thirty-three to forty-five. However, The Black Death sparked reactions in the Christian and Muslim populations by causing them to have vastly different responses to who and why The Black Death started. The Christians believed that the Jews were spreading the “curse” by poisoning the water sources but, the Muslims believed that the disease was a blessing from Allah.

The Muslims were expected and in return, accepted the disease as a “gift” from Allah. Muhammad Ibn Abdullah, an Islamic prophet, was believed to be sent by God (Allah)
…show more content…
Additionally, both religions would drink a substance of American clay to help with the curing of The Black Death. They also both realized, after some time, that the disease was spread through the air, and by exposures to the bodies. In 1343, the Mongolian leader Janibeg used the infected of his own army as weapons in the Siege of Caffa. The ways they believed the plague was spread were also similar in ways. Both religions believed and eventually knew of the disease being spread through the ways above so they started burning the bodies and even throwing them in rivers. In a well known account Pope Clement the sixth consecrated the Rhone River because of the loss of places to bury the dead. He made it holy ground, and then preceded by having the bodies dumped out in the river and floating downstream. As one can tell the differences tremendously outnumber the similarities in the Christian and Muslim reactions to The Black Death.
The two major religions, Christianity and Islam, dealt with The Black Death in their different responses. As one believed the disease was a blessing from Allah, the Muslims, Christians believed that it was a curse brought on and caused by the Jews. As one can tell, considering the evidence, there are more differences than similarities, and in closure the Christians and Muslims had very controversial outlooks and responses to The Black Death and why and how it occurred and thrived throughout Europe and

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Black Death In England

    • 1714 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Hundreds of people marched through the city calling out for forgiveness from Mary and Christ (Galli 2). Self harm was not enough for these victims, so they began to carry out barbaric acts and tortured the Jews. They targeted the Jews because they believed that they were to blame for the plague and poisoning the water from city water sources. Christians believed that the Jews were doing this because they wanted to kill all Christians and take over the world (McGill 1). All people of all religions were being killed by the plague, which allowed the people to see Jews were not specifically targeting Christians.…

    • 1714 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As previously mentioned, the Jews were considered responsible for spreading the plague. One common belief was that the Jews poisoned the wells. Many Jews were massacred during mob violence; especially in Germany. Some Jews escaped death by agreeing to Christian baptisms. Many Jews fearing violence migrated to Eastern Europe.…

    • 1733 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When the poisoned air entered the body, it went to the heart – considered, in medieval times, the organ of respiration – and then contaminated the body’s vital spirit and caused its organs to rot (Decameron Web, Treatise of the Paris Consilium). Some Christian medieval citizens believed the plague was part of the Book of Revelation which included foretold of four signs of the Apocalypse including pestilence, war, famine, and death. The Apocalypse meant that Christ’s return would be soon. Some Christians thought God was punishing them and turned to a group known as flagellants, who whipped and scourged themselves as penance of their society’s sins (McKay,…

    • 700 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Black Death was a disease that killed over one-third of the population in Europe and also in the middle east, it was caused by the black rat then spread by the flea and transferred to humans. Christian and Muslim responses on The Black Death were completely different. The Christian’s saw the plague as punishment, while Muslims saw it as a blessing from God. Although their responses were completely different, they both believed that the plague was from God. Christian’s during the Black Death didn’t only blame God for the plague, they also accused the Jews of poisoning their wells.…

    • 382 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Since the spread and destruction of the Black Death, also known as the plague, many theories arose for what the cause and reason behind this devastating disease were. The final verdict was that the Black Death was a natural occurrence of disease that was spread through animals. While discussing this more accurate verdict and also discussing the previous verdicts from the time of right after the Black Death had dissipated. The underlying causes and aftermath of this plague has killed over tens of thousands of people, throughout this paper, the Black Death will become clearer to some, or may even change the minds of others. The Black Death, a wide spread infection or disease that killed many, leaving behind nothing but despair, and ashes of those…

    • 1459 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Bubonic Plague

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The patient would be announced cured. This terrifying disease started somewhere. The Bubonic Plague started in Asia in the year 1334. Many people blamed the Jewish people and believed the Jews wanted to destroy Christianity. People believed that the Jews poisoned the water which was believed to be how the plague came about.…

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    People thought god was angry at them so many of them became Flagellants whipping themselves believing that this extreme form of penance you appease God and he would forgive their sins. However, this would only make them more likely to contract the disease causing most of them to die. Christians believed it was the Jews who caused the plague; in France and Italy rumors began emerging that the Jews had contaminated the wells intentionally trying to poison Christians. This lead to assaults on Jewish communities all over Europe, by the end of the plague in 1351 entire Jewish communities had been eradicated in many places. As the Plague continued to…

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The plague killed about twenty-five million people, but it did have a positive influence on the world since it improved medicine and medical technology. The plague had a devastating impact on medieval towns and many Christians blamed Jews, the poor foreigners and travelers, for the spread of the plague (Feld 20). Christians tortured Jews into confessing that they were responsible for poisoning all water sources, and Jews were…

    • 1015 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Jews have been persecuted throughout time. This can be observed in the year 1349, when Jews were given the false accusation of producing the black plague. The Christians in this nation were prejudiced, discriminatory, and persecuted the Jews harshly. They claimed that the Jews had placed poison in their water sources, which therefore caused many deaths. Many Europeans had come to despise the Jews, who conceived wealth from money lending.…

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Plague Dbq Essay

    • 1257 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Bubonic Plague was one of the single most devastating events of the medieval era. The Plague, also called "Black Death" is suspected to have originated in China and the far east, coming to Europe during the late 1340 's and early 1350 's by way of shipping and trade routes. By the time the plague had abated, almost half of Europe 's population had been killed by this deadly disease. The results of the plague was extremely damaging not just to the population of Europe, but to the basis of society itself. The Plague had such a devastating effect on European society because the moral code of the populations dissolved, the emphasis and practice of religious faith declined, and the value and importance of traditional relationships decreased.…

    • 1257 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays