African American Racial Equality

Improved Essays
Lynching has occurred throughout the history of the United States, the bloodthirsty gatherings grew in popularity and flourished throughout the South after slaves had become emancipated in 1863, after the Reconstruction era. White Southerners blamed the overwhelming amount of lynchings on the African American population, claiming that the growing idea of racial equality provoked African Americans to display their dominance through false accusations that involved white women.
Senator Benjamin R. Tillman insisted that the amount of lynching was due to the fear of the racial hierarchy being challenged by the negro population. The movement inspired by false accusations created an environment full of hatred, segregation, and fear towards the African American community in the United States. In Senator Benjamin R.
…show more content…
Many people were against racial equality and wanted to continue oppressing the black community. These officials who worked in office are supposed to be working towards a unified country, yet views such as Tillman’s constricted and hindered the progress of an racially equal country. These discriminative events were occurring all the over the southern United States, not just in South Carolina. The credibility of the accusations towards African American was beginning to diminish. In Ida B. Wells excerpt Southern Horrors, she states that “nobody in this section of the country believes the old thread-bare lie that Negro men rape white women.” Both sides of the community, white and black, were growing increasingly worrisome. White citizens were becoming exhausted and fearful of the African American community, because they had begun to unify and enforce their racial equality through any means necessary. The black community felt more stigmatized because the more they tried practicing their rights and equality, the more white community would hinder their progress by further

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    This idealistic theology resided heavily in the South, blacks were segregated, oppressed, and lynched. In a span of approximately forty years after 1889 over 3,745 African Americans were lynched. Blacks were falsely accused of harassing white women, and in result angry riots would gather and lynch numbers of African Americans. Most of the time lynching riots were used as a way to oppress blacks because of their economic success. An example of this was Thomas Moss, a co-owner of a grocery store in Memphis.…

    • 1217 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    All of this lynching started because after the Civil War slaves were no longer property and had freedom but some white people thought that the newly freed slaves had “too much freedom” and “needed to be controlled”. People were scared, they were scared of the change that the freedom of slaves would bring. Conformity was huge in this time because if someone was to speak out against the lynchings or try and stop them they would end up getting lynched. So rather than doing what is right and calling the police or trying to put a stop to it people conformed and went along with it. Which happens quite a lot in history, if you think about…

    • 1032 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Book Critique: Racial Equality in America, by John Hope Franklin. This paper is developed to display a summary of "Racial Equality in America", by John Hope Franklin, and to make a critique of the book. The first part shows information about the author and the credentials that confirm him as an important spokesman for racial equality in America. Also, after the summary, I will try to give my humble vision on how to change the "obsession" of Americans regarding racism (adjective copied by me from Franklin).…

    • 2219 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Achieving Racial Equality

    • 2514 Words
    • 11 Pages

    Achieving Racial Equality Within The United States Out of all the cases that have dealt with racial inequality and segregation Brown v. Board Of Education of Topeka has to be number one on the list for having the biggest impact on those topics. Brown v. Board of Education was a case that would determine the outcome of public education in the United States. It all started with Plessy v. Ferguson when the court created the “separate but equal” doctrine. This doctrine states that if a school choose to be racially segregated that they must provide a separate facility that provides the same accommodations as the original school (this originally was not intended for schools but instead for transportation).…

    • 2514 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although the North was progressing with the integration of black people, the South was holding out strong going against integration. The South did a lot of things to hold segregation to their tradition. They were scared to change. This essay will show how the South lived before the Emmett Till case and the Civil Rights’ Movement, also what the South did to resist integration, and lastly how the town of Money,Mississippi, worked together so two killers did not get convicted for a murder of a black forteen-year old boy.…

    • 463 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ever since 1787, and even before, African-Americans have struggled to gain political, legal, social, and economic equality. Although some national and state government programs were constructed to help African-Americans with this perpetual problem, it is also the same state and national government policies that expanded this problem. In fact, this is still a problem that persists today. The national and state governments definitely have gone a long way in providing African Americans with political, legal and social opportunities; however constant setbacks have lessened their effectiveness. Beginning in 1787 there was an unspoken guarantee that all states had the option to decide whether or not they wanted to be slave sates.…

    • 1951 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Superiority of Whites over Blacks Back in the early 1930s in Southern Alabama everything was seen as black and white. The color white was definitely superior to the black color. Black people were highly motivated to work and produce for their future and families, but there was this racism; discrimination; and segregation against colored people that impeded their success. All of this factors that destroyed the lives of 9 young black teenagers. Only southerner whites had the opportunity to have better jobs such as being a police officer; the respect from their society; and most importantly the power to do whatever they pleased, including mistreating this minority group.…

    • 1722 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As I skim the internet and history books for information on the 1940’s discrimination between blacks and whites. Many images arise that are grotesque in nature with bodies hanging from trees, badly beaten and burned. In the back ground of these images you can see white faces floating with laughter and wide eyes staring at their tortured victims. These people truly enjoyed the murdering of their African American neighbors. Most of these lynchings took place in poor southern towns and as a result “the lynching became a form of cheap entertainment”…

    • 810 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Southern Horrors Summary

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages

    An Analysis of Southern Horrors and Other Writings In the period immediately following the Civil War, racial tensions were extremely high in the South. During this period of Reconstruction, the majority of white citizens still fostered deep hatred towards recently freed African Americans. As a result, lynch law prevailed. Hundreds of African Americans were viciously murdered, as the government failed to step in and stop the killings.…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “The Struggle for Black Equality” by Harvard Sitkoff, summarizes the key elements in the fight for the civil rights of African Americans from 1954-1980. The book was set up in chronological order, each chapter embodying the new step to gain equality. The first chapter is titled “Up from slavery,” it consists of the small actions that took place slowly to assure the equal rights. By the end of the first chapter, the concept of equal rights was introduced more prominently, opening people's eyes to the problem. Nevertheless, there was still doubt in the system and people who did not agree.…

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ida B. Well’s narration in the book On Lynchings, is a story of a time in history of the United States that encompasses the period between late 1800s and the early 1900s. The author provides an account of experiences in the areas inhabited by the African American racial group together with the whites. Being a black woman, she gives her accounts of events in her own environment and vividly provides evidence of the occurrences. She gives an account of the racial discrimination that transpired during the period of Afro-American persecution. She narrates about the law of lynching that was imposed on the black people to control them and terrorize them to fear and respect the whites.…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    *"For Africa to me...is more than a glamorous fact. It is a historical truth. No man can know where he is going unless he knows exactly where he has been and exactly how he arrived at his present place" (Angelou). The treatment of African Americans in the United States has historically been that of great injustice. They have suffered through the hardships of slavery, segregation, and the recurring racism that is still prominent in society today.…

    • 1257 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Racism had made Robinson’s fate of dead inevitable. “Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella Ewell opened her mouth and screamed”. In the particular place and time, it was simply because Tom was black and Mayella was white. In the era of 1930s, the whites had overwhelming power over the blacks who were seldom protected by law. Although Atticus did a brilliant job to expose Bob Ewell and his daughter’s lies and convinced most people that Tom Robinson was closer to innocence than sin, and it took extra effort and time for the jury to make a verdict, the sentence was still guilty, due to the predominance of racist opinion at that time.…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Symbolism In Strange Fruit, By Billie Holiday

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    Popular images are of an angry white mob stringing a black man up to a tree is which would only be half of the story. Lynching is an act of terror meant to spread fear among blacks, with also a broad social purpose of maintaining white supremacy in the economic, social, and political spheres. Although the practice of lynching had existed since before slavery, it was gaining momentum, when black towns sprang up across the South and the African American community began to make political and economic inroads by registering to vote, establishing businesses and running for public office. Many whites, landowners, and poor whites felt they were threatened by the rise in black communities. Foremost on their minds was a fear of sex between the races.…

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    America has strongly founded itself upon being a multicultural nation, yet still racism has been and still continues to be an issue. Race and discrimination is amongst the most controversial topics discussed today. There has been steps taken to eliminate racism for example the Civil Right Movement which sought to improve the rights of African Americans, but even these improvements were not instantaneous. Decades later we see that racism still continues to have a strong presence in our society. John Edgar Wiedman is a writer who used his literature to expose these issues.…

    • 1605 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays